Weekend warrior only works for rich people, study says

Only people with higher incomes can afford to be 'weekend warriors' in the gym - but they still face health woes from their sedentary work life, a study warns.

Experts are observing more people cramming all their week's exercise into two days, since they don't have time during the week.

However, a new report by the American Cancer Society found that the only weekend warriors who meet their week's exercise needs are wealthy - perhaps because they can cover the eye-watering costs of highly intense workout programs like CrossFit and SoulCycle.

And yet, the data show those individuals are still more sedentary than others during the week.

It means that weekend warriors who don't have the money for bootcamp-style classes, and simply rely on a run outside, have no chance of reaching their recommended weekly amount of fitness, increasing their risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Experts warns the figures should be a red flag to public health officials since more and more people – both low income and high income –  are working long hours in sedentary office jobs, with little time to exercise.

The 'weekend warrior' trend is where people cram a week of workouts into two days due to time constraints. Researchers found that people with higher incomes were meeting their exercise needs more but were more sedentary during the week 

The 'weekend warrior' trend is where people cram a week of workouts into two days due to time constraints. Researchers found that people with higher incomes were meeting their exercise needs more but were more sedentary during the week 

The American Heart Association recommends that adults spend 150 minutes per week doing moderate-intensity exercises (walking, cycling or swimming) or 75 minutes per week doing vigorous exercises (running).

American Cancer Society researchers studied accelerometer data from 5,206 adults to analyze physical activity trends.

With this data, they compared how often people were active and inactive compared to their income level.

Researchers noticed from the activity monitors that those with an annual income of $75,000 or higher were more likely to be sedentary during the week and more active during the weekend.  

These individuals were also more likely to meet their physical requirement guidelines. 

Lower income individuals of $20,000 or lower were not as sedentary during the week but also less likely to meet their exercise needs.

Previous research collected from activity monitors has shown

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