Livestreaming the solar eclipse could overload networks

If you plan to livestream this month's solar eclipse from one of the prime viewing spots, experts have some advice - put your phone away.

The August 21 solar eclipse, when passage of the moon completely blocks out the sun, will be seen first in Oregon and cut diagonally across 14 states to South Carolina, and millions are expected to flock to see the first total solar eclipse visible coast-to-coast since 1918.

However, phone networks have issued a warning to users admitting that if too many people go online to livestream the event, it could  

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During a total solar eclipse, the moon completely blocks the face of the sun, NASA explains. For this phenomenon to take place, the moon and the sun must be perfectly aligned, allowing the moon to appear as though it’s the exact size of the sun

During a total solar eclipse, the moon completely blocks the face of the sun, NASA explains. For this phenomenon to take place, the moon and the sun must be perfectly aligned, allowing the moon to appear as though it’s the exact size of the sun

The best places to see it fall within a 60- to 70-mile-wide swath known as the 'path of totality,' where there will be periods of total darkness ranging up to two minutes and 40 seconds. 

WHERE TO SEE THE TOTAL ECLIPSE

The path of totality will stretch from Lincoln Beach, Oregon, to Charleston South Carolina.

To find out exactly when and where it will be visible, visit NASA's interactive map, and click on a city along the path.

Totality will cross the US from west to east, beginning at Lincoln Beach, Oregon, where totality will occur at 10:16 a.m. (PDT).

It will the US over roughly an hour and a half, passing through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North and South Carolina.

It will end near Charleston, South Carolina, at 2:48 p.m. (EDT), according to NASA.

The path carves through largely rural areas, where cellphone service can be spotty at best, though, so it may not be possible to quickly post to Facebook, Instagram and the like even though carriers plan to temporarily boost capacity in some places.

'We're expecting a good experience but there will be times at peak where the network will struggle,' said Paula Doublin, assistant vice president for construction and engineering for AT&T, the nation's second-largest provider.

Some communities are hosting eclipse-watch gatherings that are expected to draw tens of thousands of people.

The 6,700 residents of Madras, Oregon, will be far outnumbered by visitors, and Verizon, AT&T and Sprint all plan to bring portable towers for its event.

AT&T will deploy eight portable cell towers across the country - in Madras and Mitchell, Oregon; Columbia, Owensville and Washington in Missouri; Carbondale, Illinois; Hopkinsville, Kentucky; and Glendo Reservoir, Wyoming.

'It is very much akin to a national championship week that occurs with the NCAA or pro sports, except it's happening in a 3,000-mile-long band,' Doublin said.

In exactly one month, the United States will be treated to its first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in nearly a century, sweeping across the country from Oregon all the way to South Carolina

In exactly one month, the United States will be treated to its first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in nearly a century, sweeping across the country from Oregon all the way to South Carolina

Protective glasses should be put on for the entirety of the time spent looking at the sun leading up to totality. Only during totality can you remove them

Protective glasses should be put on for the entirety of the time spent looking at the sun leading up to totality. Only during totality can you remove them

Sprint and Verizon Wireless, which is the nation's

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