Wisconsin company holds 'chip party' to microchip workers

A Wisconsin technology firm has held a 'chip party' to install microchips in the hands of its employees.

The chips, no larger than a small grain of rice, allow workers at Three Square Market, also known as 32M, to open doors, log onto computers and buy breakroom snacks. 

The firm said 41 of its 85 employees agreed to be microchipped during a chip party at company headquarters in River Falls on Tuesday.

Officials said the data in the microchip is encrypted and does not use GPS, so it cannot be used to track employees or obtain private information. 

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A Wisconsin technology firm has held a 'chip party' to install microchips in the hands of its employees. Pictured is Tony Danna (left), vice president of international development at Three Square Market in River Falls, receiving a microchip in his left hand at company headquarters

A Wisconsin technology firm has held a 'chip party' to install microchips in the hands of its employees. Pictured is Tony Danna (left), vice president of international development at Three Square Market in River Falls, receiving a microchip in his left hand at company headquarters

HOW DO THE CHIPS WORK? 

Each chip has been implanted between the thumb and forefinger underneath the skin.

Users of the chip will scan their items at a break room market kiosk and hit pay with a credit card.

Chip users will then hold their hands up, similar to how consumers pay for products using their smartphones, and it'll pay for the product.

Officials said the data in the microchip is encrypted and does not use GPS, so it cannot be used to track employees or obtain private information. 

Three Square Market, which designs software for break room markets, has now become the first US firm to offer microchip implants to its employees. 

Melissa Timmins, vice president of sales at 32M, said she was initially apprehensive but decided to give the chip a chance.

'I planned for the worst and it wasn't bad at all,' said Ms Timmins, who received a microchip in her left hand on Monday.

'Just a little prick.'

But marketing executive Katie Langer declined theoffer, citing health concerns related to putting a foreign object into her hand.

She noted the chip received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2004.

'But that's still not very long term in my book, so I'd just like to know more about the long-term health effects,' Ms Langer said, adding that she is not ruling out a future implant of the $300 (£227) microchip paid for by Three

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