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U.S., Russian crew transfer to space station

Two U.S. astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut arrived at the International Space Station on Wednesday, about six hours after their Soyuz spacecraft blasted off from Kazakhstan, a NASA TV broadcast showed.

Commander Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos and flight engineers Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba of NASA lifted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome at 3:17 a.m. local time on Wednesday (21:17 GMT/17:17 EDT on Tuesday). 

Their spacecraft docked at 8:55 a.m..

The crew successfully performed a fast-track transit to the station, which orbits about 250 miles (400 km) above Earth, to begin a five-month mission. 

The Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying two US astronauts and a Russia cosmonaut launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome as scheduled early Wednesday. The new crew members arrived at the International Space Station about six hours later

The Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying two US astronauts and a Russia cosmonaut launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome as scheduled early Wednesday. The new crew members arrived at the International Space Station about six hours later

THE STENCH OF SPACE

In an interview about the experiences detailed in his upcoming space memoir Endurance, Wired asked NASA astronaut Scott Kelly if he ever finds himself in a place where the smells trigger a memory of being in space.

And, Kelly revealed the ISS smells like jail, citing the similarities in their 'combinations of antiseptic, garbage, and body odor.'

While touring Harris County Jail in Texas, Kelly said he got a whiff in one room that transported him right back to his days on the ISS.

He explained that people in the ISS use deodorant, rinse off, shower, and that the smell isn't that bad, 'but there's a little body odor going on for sure.' 

'Mostly it’s just exercise clothes people wear for a couple weeks without washing.' 

NASA says residents of the ISS only change their socks and underwear every other day, and shirts and pants every 10 days. 

It might sound unsanitary to earthlings but, according to the agency, these garments do not get as dirty in space as they do on earth. 

Failure would have forced the spacecraft to take a two-day route for another attempt at docking.

Misurkin, Vande Hei and Acaba have joined NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik, Russia's Sergey Ryazanskiy and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency who have been aboard the orbital outpost since July.

To commemorate the upcoming 60th anniversary on Oct.4 of the launch of the first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, the Soyuz crew used its small model as a zero gravity indicator during the flight on

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