Adelaide man collects parcel with millions worth of drugs

An elderly man and his neighbour have become the unwitting victims of a million-dollar drug deal scam.

Bruce Hockley, from Adelaide, had been collecting mail for his friend Lindsay Barton while he was out of state when he signed for an unusual package.

Inside were tins containing more than a million dollars' worth of drugs, which had been delivered to his unsuspecting neighbour's house afters hackers found out it was empty.

Adelaide man Bruce Hockley had been doing the neighbourly thing by collecting mail for his friend Lindsay Barton while he was out of state, when he signed for an unusual package

Adelaide man Bruce Hockley had been doing the neighbourly thing by collecting mail for his friend Lindsay Barton while he was out of state, when he signed for an unusual package

After the courier delivered the mystery parcel Mr Hockley opened it, but became confused by the contents he found.

'I got a knife, opened it and had a look in. It looked like tins of goods and it was packed with dry biscuits around it,' Hockley told Today Tonight Adelaide.

But after noticing a strange handwritten note attached to his neighbour's window, combined with the wrong name on the parcel, Mr Hockley decided to call his friend.

'When he said it came from Ireland I thought that was a bit peculiar because I don't know anybody in Ireland,' Mr Barton said.

He added: 'Bruce then told me it was my address but not my name. I said this is very very suspicious. I think you better ring the police.'

When officers arrived they took the parcel to examine it, before calling in the bomb squad, who dismantled the box and took photographic evidence.

Inside were tins containing more than a million dollars worth of drugs that had been delivered to Mr Hockley's unsuspecting neighbour's house

Inside were tins containing more than a million dollars worth of drugs that had been delivered to Mr Hockley's unsuspecting neighbour's house

Mr Barton's house had become a drop-off point for drugs after hackers found out via social media that he was interstate, with the group attaching a handwritten note to the house's window

Mr Barton's house had become a drop-off point for drugs after hackers found out via social media that he was interstate, with the group attaching a handwritten

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