Diana's ex-aide says Diana Tapes are 'historic records'

Princess Diana's mood could be worse than 'Boudicca with a headache' because she was 'trapped with the knowledge that her husband loved another woman', one of her closest aides said today.

Patrick Jephson also claims his former boss' fiery temper meant she 'could sometimes burn uncomfortably hot' as he backed the broadcast of the infamous Diana Tapes this weekend.

They were recorded during Diana's her speech coach sessions 25 years ago show her speaking candidly about her upbringing, her courtship with the Prince of Wales, her troubled marriage and her public life.

Mr Jephson, equerry and private secretary to the Princess for eight years until 1996, says the films are part of 'historic records' and should be shown.

Despite claims Channel 4's decision is 'deeply hurtful' to her sons William and Harry he says the footage of Diana shows a 'Princess finding her voice'.

Patrick Jephson, former private secretary to the Princess of Wales, claims his former boss had a fiery temper that 'could sometimes burn uncomfortably hot' as he backed the broadcast of the infamous Diana tapes this weekend

Patrick Jephson, former private secretary to the Princess of Wales, claims his former boss had a fiery temper that 'could sometimes burn uncomfortably hot' as he backed the broadcast of the infamous Diana tapes this weekend

The tapes feature her speaking candidly and informally about her upbringing, her courtship with the Prince of Wales, her troubled marriage and her ¿very odd¿ sex life.

The tapes feature her speaking candidly and informally about her upbringing, her courtship with the Prince of Wales, her troubled marriage and her ¿very odd¿ sex life.

The tapes feature her speaking candidly and informally about her upbringing, her courtship with the Prince of Wales, her troubled marriage and her ‘very odd’ sex life during vocal coaching lessons between September 1992 and December 1993 (pictured)

In the recordings, Diana discloses intimate details of her failed marriage to Prince Charles

In the recordings, Diana discloses intimate details of her failed marriage to Prince Charles

He told Radio Times magazine that he had 'better reason than most to know that the Princess could be a mercurial and impulsive figure, in whom the flame of an angry fire could sometimes burn uncomfortably hot'.

Mr Jephson said Diana had a temper but was right to be angry because she was 'trapped with the knowledge that her husband loved another woman'

Mr Jephson said Diana had a temper but was right to be angry because she was 'trapped with the knowledge that her husband loved another woman'

Mr Jephson compared Diana to Boudicca, who led the ancient British uprising against the Romans in around 60AD. 

He said: 'On a bad day - and luckily they were few - you'd think Boudicca with a headache might be an easier boss.

'But guess what? She had every reason to be angry, trapped with the knowledge that her husband loved another woman.' 

Defending Sunday's broadcast he told Radio Times magazine: ' Bewitchingly, they reveal a thoughtful and often funny Princess finding her voice as the teller of her own story.

'It was this rare ability to infuse her public speeches with disarming personal candour that made Diana such an effective communicator.

'One of the reasons we remember her, and still want to hear her voice, is that she spoke not with technical fluency but with an authenticity that came from the heart (or gut, if you prefer).

'Her audiences instinctively recognised that what she was telling them owed far more to her own emotions and experience than to the efforts of her speech writers.' 

He added that the tapes were 'legitimate additions to the historical record'.

Mr Jephson insists that the tapes should be shown were 'legitimate additions to the historical record'.

Mr Jephson insists that the tapes should be shown were 'legitimate additions to the historical record'.

Channel 4 has defended its decision to show the tapes, insisting they are an ¿important historical source¿ 

Channel 4 has defended its decision to show the tapes, insisting they are an 'important historical source' 

During the explosive interviews with Mr Settelen, Diana also discusses Charles' relationship with Camilla Parker Bowles. Pictured, the pair together in 2000

During the explosive interviews with Mr Settelen, Diana also discusses Charles' relationship with Camilla Parker Bowles. Pictured, the pair together in 2000

During the lessons, which took place between September 1992 and December 1993 at Kensington Palace, Diana opened up to her voice coach Peter Settelen. 

Channel 4 has defended the tapes, never before broadcast on British TV, describing the material as an 'important historical source'.

Diana: In Her Own Words is centred around the tapes recorded by her speech coach and ex-Coronation Street actor Peter Settelen

Diana: In Her Own Words is centred around the tapes recorded by her speech coach and ex-Coronation Street actor Peter Settelen

It said that 'the subjects covered are a matter of public record and provide a unique insight into the preparations Diana undertook to gain a public voice and tell her own personal story'.

The 83-minute video, which was sold to NBC for an estimated £700,000, was one of several made by Mr Settelen as he coached Diana on public speaking.

They were made between September 1992 and December 1993. Diana and Charles officially separated in December 1992.

The tapes disappeared from Diana's apartment at Kensington Palace after her death in 1997 but were discovered four years ago in the

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