Breaking news
Rio Ferdinand 'preparing to propose to Kate Wright' -
Danielle Lloyd returns to social media a week after birth -
Queensland prison inmate dies in vicious brawl -
Hillary and Huma arrive outside the Late Show -
Jourdan Dunn flashes her long legs in sexy PVC trousers -
Rebel Wilson spotted Filming London since record payout -
Serena Williams pens heartfelt letter thanking her mom -
Sex offender Nigel Pindan attacked sleeping women released -

ABS warns stop publishing same-sex marriage forms online

Australians have been urged not to post a picture online of their same-sex marriage survey revealing the form's barcode because it could jeopardize their vote. 

Numerous people published images of their form - some including their address and unique barcode - to social media this week as the survey arrived in household mailboxes.

By doing so, they risk their vote being tampered with by a stranger who spotted it online, the Australian Bureau of Statistics has warned.

The barcode is used to ensure no one can respond to the survey multiple times and is used to register the form when it is returned, a spokesman told The Sydney Morning Herald.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has urged people not to post a picture online of their same-sex marriage survey (pictured) revealing the form's barcode because it could jeopardize their vote

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has urged people not to post a picture online of their same-sex marriage survey (pictured) revealing the form's barcode because it could jeopardize their vote

Numerous people published images of their form - some including their address and unique barcode - to social media this week as the survey arrived in household mailboxes

Numerous people published images of their form - some including their address and unique barcode - to social media this week as the survey arrived in household mailboxes

The ABS' warning comes after a slew of Australians went online to cheer on former occupants of their homes, claiming their failure to redirect their mail has left the new residents with extra votes (pictured) 

The ABS' warning comes after a slew of Australians went online to cheer on former occupants of their homes, claiming their failure to redirect their mail has left the new residents with extra votes (pictured) 

It is possible a stranger could replicate the barcode, alter the person's response and return it before the correct individual can.

If the fraudulent survey is received first, their response is counted instead. 

The ABS' warning comes after a slew of Australians went online to cheer on former occupants of their homes, claiming their failure to redirect their mail has left the new residents with extra votes.

Would-be voters said their extra mail would finally be put to use, with one man claiming he had received seven extra votes.

'Big ups to the seven people that haven't changed their enrolment info and their vote mail came to my house,' he wrote on Twitter.

'My vote just evolved 7 times hahaha.'

If a stranger spots the barcode online, they can alter the person's response and return it before the correct individual can, the ABS warned

If a stranger spots the barcode online, they can alter the person's response and return it before the correct individual can, the ABS warned

In another instance, a photo claiming to show how the supposedly secret same-sex marriage postal vote can be seen through the envelope created controversy online (pictured) 

In another instance, a photo claiming to show how the supposedly secret same-sex marriage postal vote can be seen through the envelope created controversy online (pictured) 

He was cheered on by a woman who said she often received mail for previous residents, and would submit a yes vote for each extra postal survey form she received. 

The pair were joined in their sentiments by another man on Facebook.

He said the

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Under Trump, future of U.S. nuclear arsenal slowly taking shape
NEXT One in three nurseries could shut in a year