Florida residents toil in heatwave to rebuild their lives

A third of Florida's population has no power or air conditioning in the state's late-summer heat as they work to rebuild their lives following the devastating damage of Hurricane Irma. 

Utility officials warn it could it could take ten days or more for power to be fully restored, despite temperatures reaching the 90s across parts of the state. 

President Donald will hear directly from people affected by Irma's fury as he makes his third visit in less than three weeks to the storm-wracked South.

, joined by First Lady Melania and Vice President Mike Pence, will visit Naples and Fort Myers on Florida's southwestern coast on Thursday to meet with those affected by the hurricane and learn more about relief efforts. 

He tweeted on on Thursday: Am leaving now for Florida to see our GREAT first responders and to thank the US Coast Guard, FEMA etc. A real disaster, much work to do!'

Homes in Big Pine Key, Florida, were destroyed when Hurricane Irma ravaged the area with heavy rains and winds over the weekend. The cleanup will take weeks and recovery could take months

Homes in Big Pine Key, Florida, were destroyed when Hurricane Irma ravaged the area with heavy rains and winds over the weekend. The cleanup will take weeks and recovery could take months

Irma laid waste to Caribbean islands and caused historic destruction across Florida over the last week. Pictured above, damage in Sunshine Key, Florida

Irma laid waste to Caribbean islands and caused historic destruction across Florida over the last week. Pictured above, damage in Sunshine Key, Florida

Utility officials warn it could it could take ten days or more for power to be fully restored, despite temperatures reaching the 90s across parts of the state. Pictured above, a boat is seen next to a home after Hurricane Irma passed through Duck Key, Florida

Utility officials warn it could it could take ten days or more for power to be fully restored, despite temperatures reaching the 90s across parts of the state. Pictured above, a boat is seen next to a home after Hurricane Irma passed through Duck Key, Florida

People walk through flooded streets in the rural migrant worker town of Immokalee, Florida, using cement blocks to stay above water

People walk through flooded streets in the rural migrant worker town of Immokalee, Florida, using cement blocks to stay above water

With their homes surrounded by water that they fear may be contaminated by waste water, residents deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Immokalee, Florida

With their homes surrounded by water that they fear may be contaminated by waste water, residents deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Immokalee, Florida

People walk through flooded streets in the rural migrant worker town of Immokalee, which was especially hard hit by Hurricane Irma on Wednesday

People walk through flooded streets in the rural migrant worker town of Immokalee, which was especially hard hit by Hurricane Irma on Wednesday

Dwayne Hope stands next to where his car was dumped by Hurricane Irma on Big Pine Key, Florida. Hope lived in his boat for the last 20 years and he tried to take shelter from the storm in his car before retreating to a nearby house. The Category 4 hurricane destroyed his car, beached his boat and took all his possessions

Dwayne Hope stands next to where his car was dumped by Hurricane Irma on Big Pine Key, Florida. Hope lived in his boat for the last 20 years and he tried to take shelter from the storm in his car before retreating to a nearby house. The Category 4 hurricane destroyed his car, beached his boat and took all his possessions

Bob Barnes, who stayed in Duck Key, Florida, huddled in a house with ten other people during Hurricane Irma, looks over the damage at a friend's home

Bob Barnes, who stayed in Duck Key, Florida, huddled in a house with ten other people during Hurricane Irma, looks over the damage at a friend's home

A boat is seen over the deck after Hurricane Irma struck the Florida Keys in Marathon, the Florida Keys. Many areas remain under a dawn to dusk curfew following the storm

A boat is seen over the deck after Hurricane Irma struck the Florida Keys in Marathon, the Florida Keys. Many areas remain under a dawn to dusk curfew following the storm

The daytrip to Florida follows two earlier outings in which took in Harvey recovery efforts in late August. 

During the president's first trip to Texas, immediately after Harvey, he drew criticism for having minimal interaction with residents, seeing little damage and offering few expressions of concern. 

On his second trip, with stops in Texas and Louisiana, he was more hands-on, visiting with those driven from their homes by Harvey, touring a Houston mega-shelter housing hundreds of displaced people and briefly walking streets lined with soggy, discarded possessions.

The president monitored Irma over the weekend from Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland.

Nearly half of Florida was engulfed by Irma, which left flooded streets, damaged homes and displaced residents in its wake.

The number of people remaining in shelters fell to under 13,000 on Thursday.  

The Keys felt Irma's full fury when the hurricane roared in after wreaking devastation in the Caribbean, but the extent of the damage has been an unanswered question because some places have been unreachable.

A national guardsman oversees water distribution in a shopping plaza in Key West, Florida. The Florida Keys were hit devastatingly hard by the storm, with 90 per cent of the homes damaged

A national guardsman oversees water distribution in a shopping plaza in Key West, Florida. The Florida Keys were hit devastatingly hard by the storm, with 90 per cent of the homes damaged

Florida Keys residents receive food and water from members of the Florida National Guard at the Sugarloaf School on Wednesday

Florida Keys residents receive food and water from members of the Florida National Guard at the Sugarloaf School on Wednesday

National guardsmen distribute bottled water to residents in Key West, Florida, in the days after they were allowed back into the region following Hurricane Irma

National guardsmen distribute bottled water to residents in Key West, Florida, in the days after they were allowed back into the region following Hurricane Irma

Residents of Key West stand in line as they wait for emergency donations following Hurricane Irma. he Florida Keys still lacks water, electricity or mobile phone service. Residents are still not permitted to go further south than Mile Marker 73

Residents of Key West stand in line as they wait for emergency donations following Hurricane Irma. he Florida Keys still lacks water, electricity or mobile phone service. Residents are still not permitted to go further south than Mile Marker 73

Residents of the rural migrant worker town of Immokalee wait for emergency donations following Hurricane Irma on Wednesday

Residents of the rural migrant worker town of Immokalee wait for emergency donations following Hurricane Irma on Wednesday

. A group of volunteers from Atlanta gave out groceries and sanitary items to hundreds of desperate residents. Hurricane Irma made landfall near Naples after inundating the Florida Keys. Electricity was out in much of the region with extensive flooding

. A group of volunteers from Atlanta gave out groceries and sanitary items to hundreds of desperate residents. Hurricane Irma made landfall near Naples after inundating the Florida Keys. Electricity was out in much of the region with extensive flooding

A resident of the Seabreeze mobile park surveys the storm surge debris deposited in his backyard after Hurricane Irma struck the Florida Keys in Marathon in the Florida Keys, Florida

A resident of the Seabreeze mobile park

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