MKR judge Pete Evans breaks his silence after leaving Channel Seven

Former My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans has broken his silence on Instagram after it emerged on Friday he had 'amicably' parted ways with Channel Seven.

The celebrity chef, 47, posted a cartoon that showed a lone man carrying a massive boulder with the words 'The Truth' carved onto it while others looked on.

The cryptic post - which suggests that Evans feels he is carrying the weight of truth on his back - hints at the possibility that he was let go because of his controversial views on alternative health.

'What are you willing to carry?' Ex-My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans has broken his silence on Instagram after it emerged on Friday he had 'amicably' parted ways with Channel Seven

'What are you willing to carry?' Ex-My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans has broken his silence on Instagram after it emerged on Friday he had 'amicably' parted ways with Channel Seven

'What are you willing to carry and share?' he captioned the post.

Evans' following of like-minded Paleo crusaders were quick to praise him, and several of them inferred that his post was alluding to his exit from Seven.

'Thank you for being steadfast despite them trying to bring you down,' one wrote.

Out on his own: The celebrity chef posted a cartoon to Instagram on Friday morning which showed a lone man carrying a massive boulder labelled 'The Truth' while others looked on

Out on his own: The celebrity chef posted a cartoon to Instagram on Friday morning which showed a lone man carrying a massive boulder labelled 'The Truth' while others looked on

Another added: 'Thanks Pete for being comfortable with questioning. Not many people are.'

'I hope that we can live harmoniously in this world with the free will to make our own decisions regarding our health and wellbeing,' a third wrote.

One follower wrote bluntly: 'Good ole Channel Seven drop you, Pete? Can't they handle the truth?'  

Rushing to his defence: Pete's devoted following of like-minded crusaders were quick to praise the passionate Paleo enthusiast, thanking him for his devotion to 'the truth'

Rushing to his defence: Pete's devoted following of like-minded crusaders were quick to praise the passionate Paleo enthusiast, thanking him for his devotion to 'the truth' 

Industry website TV Blackbox reported on Thursday that Evans had recently come to a 'mutual' and 'amicable' decision to leave the network after 10 years.

He is understood to be happy with his newfound independence and reportedly plans to expand his 'alternative lifestyle empire' by marketing books, documentaries and other merchandise.

It comes amid rumours My Kitchen Rules will not be returning for a twelfth series next year after its latest season, MKR: The Rivals, flopped in the ratings. 

Parting ways: Pete Evans, the My Kitchen Rules judge whose alternative health advocacy has outraged doctors, led to official sanctions and inspired a devoted following of like-minded crusaders, has departed Channel Seven after 10 years. Pictured in January 2013

Parting ways: Pete Evans, the My Kitchen Rules judge whose alternative health advocacy has outraged doctors, led to official sanctions and inspired a devoted following of like-minded crusaders, has departed Channel Seven after 10 years. Pictured in January 2013

Free at last! Evans is understood to be happy with his newfound independence and reportedly plans to expand his 'alternative lifestyle empire' by marketing books and documentaries

Free at last! Evans is understood to be happy with his newfound independence and reportedly plans to expand his 'alternative lifestyle empire' by marketing books and documentaries

News of Evans' departure followed weeks of silence from Seven regarding the controversial host's employment status.

The broadcaster had been ignoring enquiries from journalists about Evans after he was fined $25,200 by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for promoting a lamp he claimed could help treat coronavirus.

Tellingly, there was no statement issued from a network spokesperson when he was slapped with the fine last month.

Meanwhile, Seven is going ahead with a new cooking format called Plate of Origin, starring Evans' former MKR sidekick, Manu Feildel, and ex-MasterChef judges Matt Preston and Gary Mehigan.

Exit: The celebrity chef recently came to a 'mutual' and 'amicable' decision to leave the network, according to industry website TV Blackbox. Pictured with Manu Feildel (left)

Exit: The celebrity chef recently came to a 'mutual' and 'amicable' decision to leave the network, according to industry website TV Blackbox. Pictured with Manu Feildel (left)

New direction: It comes amid rumours My Kitchen Rules will not be returning for a twelfth series next year after its latest season, MKR: The Rivals, flopped in the ratings

New direction: It comes amid rumours My Kitchen Rules will not be returning for a twelfth series next year after its latest season, MKR: The Rivals, flopped in the ratings

Replacement: Seven is going ahead with a new cooking format called Plate of Origin, starring Evans' former MKR sidekick, Manu Feildel (centre), and ex-MasterChef judges Matt Preston (right) and Gary Mehigan (left)

Replacement: Seven is going ahead with a new cooking format called Plate of Origin, starring Evans' former MKR sidekick, Manu Feildel (centre), and ex-MasterChef judges Matt Preston (right) and Gary Mehigan (left)

While Evans has yet to formally comment on his departure from Seven, he hinted at an upcoming announcement on Instagram on Wednesday.

'The future is looking freakin bright and we have some exciting news to share very soon,' he wrote alongside a photo of himself in a wetsuit on a surfing trip.

Evans - who was rumoured to be on an $800,000 contract at Seven - also revealed on Tuesday he was working on a new cookbook of 'immunity-boosting recipes'. 

Inside Pete Evans' history of controversy - including bizarre claims the Paleo diet can prevent autism and advising against wearing sunscreen - after he was fined for promoting a 'healing lamp' he claimed could treat the 'Wuhan virus' 

Evans was fined $25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp that he claimed could help treat coronavirus.

But it wasn't the first time he had found himself in hot water over his bizarre theories and unscientific claims.

From questionable diet advice to strange ideas about health and wellness, Daily Mail Australia takes a look at Evans' long history of controversy.

It's also worth noting that while Evans has drawn the ire of scientists with his views, he has a devoted following in the alternative health space and is regarded by some as a martyr who sacrificed mainstream acceptability in order to preach 'the truth'.

Divisive: Evans (pictured in 2013) was fined $25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp that he claimed could help treat coronavirus - but it wasn't the first time he had found himself in hot water over his bizarre theories and unscientific claims

Divisive: Evans (pictured in 2013) was fined $25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp that he claimed could help treat coronavirus - but it wasn't the first time he had found himself in hot water over his bizarre theories and unscientific claims

October 2014: Evans claims the Paleo diet can prevent autism

In October 2014, Evans posted a 2,100-word rant on Facebook bizarrely claiming that the modern Australian diet was behind the rise in autism.

Evans took aim at the Heart Foundation and the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) while promoting the supposed benefits of the Paleo diet. 

'Why has our rate of autism jumped from 1 in 10,000 children in 1974, to 1 in 50 in 2014? Where do you think it will be in another 40 years if it is escalating at this rate? This has grown rapidly since the guidelines have been in place!' he wrote.

History of Pete Evans' controversies

October 2014: Evans claims the Paleo diet can prevent autism

March 2015: His book is pulled from shelves due to its bone broth recipe for infants

July 2016: Evans claims vegan women should eat meat during pregnancy, advises against wearing 'normal' sunscreen, and claims Wi-Fi is 'dangerous' 

August 2016: He says osteoporosis suffers shouldn't eat dairy

September 2016: Evans claims camel milk could supplement breastfeeding 

April 2017: Evans campaigns against the 'mass fluoridation of public water'

December 2018: Evans reveals he looks directly into the sun

April 2020Evans' ketogenic recipe book is slammed by health professionals and he is fined for promoting his 'healing lamp' 

Among the experts who slammed Evans' claims at the time was renowned autism expert Professor Cheryl Dissanayake. 

'There is absolutely no evidence that diet is the cause of autism,' Professor Dissanayake said. 

WHAT IS THE PALEO DIET? 

Sometimes referred to as the 'Caveman Diet,' the Paleo diet advocates eating unprocessed foods that our ancestors would have eaten in the Paleolithic era.

WHAT DOES IT INCLUDE? 

Eating vegetables, berries, nuts and lean meats while discarding dairy, grains, caffeine, alcohol and refined sugars.

WHAT DO PROFESSIONALS THINK? 

Despite the growing popularity of the diet, some medical professionals have spoken out against it, saying those who practice it can miss out on some essential vitamins and nutrients.

March 2015: Evans' book is pulled from shelves due to its bone broth recipe for infants

Evans' Paleo cookbook for children, Bubba Yum Yum, was pulled from shelves in March 2015.

An expert claimed the book's bone broth recipe for infants could kill a baby due to its high vitamin A content.

The Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) released a statement saying that the book could lead to the deaths of children across the country.

Pulled: Evans' Paleo cookbook for children, Bubba Yum Yum, was pulled from shelves in March 2015 after an expert claimed the book's bone broth recipe could potentially kill infants

Pulled: Evans' Paleo cookbook for children, Bubba Yum Yum, was pulled from shelves in March 2015 after an expert claimed the book's bone broth recipe could potentially kill infants

'In my view, there's a very real possibility that a baby may die if this book goes ahead,' said Professor Heather Yeatman, president of the PHAA. 

Evans instead published the book independently online.

July 2016: Evans claims vegan women should eat meat during pregnancy

Evans angered fans on Facebook in July 2016 by telling women not to follow a vegan diet if they 'are wanting to reproduce'. 

However, health experts warned the public not to follow Evans' advice without doing their own research.

'I wouldn't recommend it to anyone': Evans angered fans on Facebook in July 2016 when he told women not to follow a vegan diet if they 'are wanting to reproduce'

'I wouldn't recommend it to anyone': Evans angered fans on Facebook in July 2016 when he told women not to follow a vegan diet if they 'are wanting to reproduce'

'The guy is dangerous. Pete Evans is a cook, he is not an anthropologist,' Robyn Chuter of Empower Total Health told Daily Mail Australia at the time. 

Despite the criticism, Evans didn't back down from his position.

'The most sensible approach to pregnancy is a diet filled with animal fats and protein,' he said at the time. 

July 2016: Evans advises against wearing 'normal' sunscreen  

Evans infamously discouraged fans from wearing 'normal sunscreen' in July 2016, claiming it was filled with 'poisonous chemicals'. 

'The silly thing is people put on normal chemical sunscreen then lay out in the sun for hours on end and think that they are safe because they have covered themselves in poisonous chemicals, which is a recipe for disaster as we are witnessing these days,' he wrote on Facebook at the time.

'We need to respect the sun but not hide from it either as it is so beneficial for us, but use common sense. The goal is always never to burn yourself.' 

'We need to respect the sun but not hide from it': Evans infamously discouraged fans from wearing 'normal sunscreen' in July 2016, claiming it was filled with 'poisonous chemicals'

'We need to respect the sun but not hide from it': Evans infamously discouraged fans from wearing 'normal sunscreen' in July 2016, claiming it was filled with 'poisonous chemicals'

Evans, who admitted he used 'generally nothing' for sun protection, enraged skin cancer experts with his remarks.

A year later he clarified his comments on Sunday Night, saying: 'A lot of sunscreens are full of toxic chemicals that you would not put on your face or on your kids' faces.

'So I've never said, "Don't use sunscreen." I've said [to] make sure you choose one that's the least toxic that's out there.'

July 2016: Evans claims Wi-Fi is 'dangerous' 

In July 2016, the outspoken chef revealed he

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