Faye Dunaway's wildest moments! Fiery Oscar-winner locked horns with Bette ... trends now

Faye Dunaway's wildest moments! Fiery Oscar-winner locked horns with Bette ... trends now
Faye Dunaway's wildest moments! Fiery Oscar-winner locked horns with Bette ... trends now

Faye Dunaway's wildest moments! Fiery Oscar-winner locked horns with Bette ... trends now

Faye Dunaway became one of the reigning screen sirens of New Hollywood in the 1960s and 1970s, astonishing the world with her beauty and talent.

But over the years her stardom was gradually eclipsed by her fearsome reputation, as feuds and claims of diva behavior swallowed up her image.

From a battle of wills with Bette Davis in the 1970s to the accusations she slapped a crew member just five years ago, Faye has always been a lightning rod for scandal.

Maya Rudolph even parodied her on Saturday Night Live last weekend, spoofing an old video that recently went viral of Faye stopping an ad shoot to scold a crew member: 'Could you leave, please? You're right in my eyeline.'

Now, with her new documentary Faye about to premiere at Cannes, DailyMail.com looks back at some of her wildest moments...

With her new documentary about to premiere at Cannes, DailyMail.com looks back at some of Faye Dunaway's wildest moments; Faye pictured at Cannes this Wednesday

With her new documentary about to premiere at Cannes, DailyMail.com looks back at some of Faye Dunaway's wildest moments; Faye pictured at Cannes this Wednesday

CLASH OF THE TITANS: Faye Dunaway v. Bette Davis

Bette Davis had her own reputation for prickliness - to the point Joan Collins, who worked with her on the 1955 drama The Virgin Queen, later called her an 'ogre.'

But Bette may have met her match when she was cast opposite Faye in the 1976 television movie The Disappearance Of Aimee.

Faye played Aimee Semple McPherson, a famous 1920s evangelist who vanished and then resurfaced under murky circumstances, with Bette as her mother.

'I can imagine no circumstances under which I would work again with Miss Dunaway,' Bette declared in her memoir This 'N That.

She accused Faye of arriving to set late without learning her lines, after nights spent 'sipping champagne in the backseat' of her 'chauffer-driven limousine.'

Once, almost 2,000 extras - working without pay - had to be kept waiting for Faye for hours in a large tabernacle in sweltering summer heat, according to Bette's book.

In order to stop them from leaving, Bette spontaneously broke into a rendition of her song I've Written A Letter To Daddy from Whatever Happened To Baby Jane?. 

'Well, she's just totally impossible,' Bette said of Fay on The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson. 'I don't think we have time to go into all the reasons.'

She denounced Faye as 'uncooperative' and a 'very unprofessional, difficult woman,' adding: 'I have never behaved in an unprofessional manner, ever.'

Faye herself has staunchly denied Bette's characterization of their working experience, arguing: 'I was just the target of her blind rage at the one sin Hollywood never forgives in its leading ladies: growing old.'

Bette Davis and Faye had an infamous feud when they played a mother and daughter in the 1976 television movie The Disappearance Of Aimee

Bette Davis and Faye had an infamous feud when they played a mother and daughter in the 1976 television movie The Disappearance Of Aimee

'Well, she's just totally impossible,' Bette said of Fay on The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson: 'I don't think we have time to go into all the reasons'

'Well, she's just totally impossible,' Bette said of Fay on The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson: 'I don't think we have time to go into all the reasons'

MOMMIE DEAREST: The woman, the myth, the legend

Although she won an Oscar for her searing performance in Network, the movie that became indelibly fused with her public persona is Mommie Dearest, in which she played Joan Crawford

Although she won an Oscar for her searing performance in Network, the movie that became indelibly fused with her public persona is Mommie Dearest, in which she played Joan Crawford

Although Faye won an Oscar for her searing performance in Network, the movie that became indelibly fused with her public persona is Mommie Dearest.

The 1981 film was based on an infamous memoir by Joan Crawford's daughter Christina, who depicted her movie star mother as an abusive alcoholic.

Faye delivered a riotously over-the-top performance as Joan, chewing the scenery in a high-camp turn that became instant catnip for parodists and drag queens.

Rutanya Alda, one of the supporting cast members, later painted a hair-raising picture of the making of Mommie Dearest.

During the iconic scene when Joan beats Christina while shrieking: 'No wire hangers!', Faye accidentally 'missed' and struck 10-year-old actress Mara Hobel so hard that 'child welfare was gonna get called,' Rutanya "claimed.

'Faye realized that she'd gone a little bit too far, and they drove for a couple of hours and they got all kinds of toys for Mara, so she was bought off,' Rutanya alleged. 

Crew members were said to be similarly unimpressed, with costume designer Irene Sharaff reportedly comparing Faye to a two-year-old.

When the movie came out, Faye's explosive performance fitted almost too perfectly with the already swirling rumors that she was - as her Chinatown director Roman Polanski once described her - 'a gigantic pain in the a**.'

Her manic turn in the film become so intertwined with her image that she resented being asked about Mommie Dearest in later interviews.

While filming an abuse scene, Faye accidentally 'missed' and struck 10-year-old actress Mara Hobel (right) so hard that 'child welfare was gonna get called,' co-star Rutanya Alda claimed

While filming an abuse scene, Faye accidentally 'missed' and struck 10-year-old actress Mara Hobel (right) so hard that 'child welfare was gonna get called,' co-star Rutanya Alda claimed

Faye delivered a riotously over-the-top performance as Joan, chewing the scenery in a high-camp turn that became instant cat nip for parodists and drag queens

Faye delivered a riotously over-the-top performance as Joan, chewing the scenery in a high-camp turn that became instant cat nip for parodists and drag queens 

'I AM BIG!': Faye Dunaway v. Andrew Lloyd Webber

In 1994, Faye went to war with one of the most powerful figures in the theater, composer and producer Andrew Lloyd Webber.

Andrew fired Faye from the Los Angeles production of his musical adaptation of the 1950 Hollywood classic Sunset Boulevard.

By that point, the show was notorious for its turnover - Andrew had already jettisoned Patti LuPone from the Broadway run and replaced her with Glenn Close.

A furious Patti filed suit against him and used her $1 million settlement to install what she called the Andrew Lloyd Webber Memorial Pool at her country house.

That same year, Andrew fired Faye during rehearsals, announcing she was unable to sing the part and canceling the Los Angeles production entirely.

Faye retaliated by giving a press conference in her backyard, decrying her firing as 'yet another capricious act by a capricious man.'

In front of a throng of reporters, she magisterially declared: 'When I auditioned for Mr. Lloyd Webber, I sang in my range. He cast me in that range, only later deciding to try to push me into a higher one.'

She sneered: 'Does he worry that his work is so fragile that it might break apart if we moved the songs outside of a range that he feels comfortable with?' 

Faye sued Andrew for $6 million, accusing him of 'inflicting injury, reputational damage and pain and suffering in the victims of his random caprices.' 

The case was ultimately settled for an amount that was kept under wraps - with an insider telling the Independent she did not get all $6 million. 

Faye was fired from the Los Angeles run of Andrew Lloyd's Webber music Sunset Boulevard, the same year Patti LuPone (pictured) was sacked from the same role on Broadway

Faye was fired from the Los Angeles run of Andrew Lloyd's Webber music Sunset Boulevard, the same year Patti LuPone (pictured) was sacked from the same role on Broadway

Faye retaliated by giving a press conference in her backyard, decrying her firing as 'yet another capricious act by a capricious man'

Faye retaliated by giving a press conference in her backyard, decrying her firing as 'yet another capricious act by a capricious man'

THROWN UNDER THE BUS: Faye Dunaway v. Supergirl

The early 1980s appeared to mark something of a nadir for Faye, who featured as the villainous Selena in the 1984 mega-flop Supergirl.

Starring Helen Slater in the title role, the picture was a lavish big-budget undertaking, made in the hopes of revitalizing a flagging franchise after Superman III received a tepid response at the box office.

Instead, Supergirl was a thunderous failure, making back less than half its budget and being almost unanimously savaged by the critics.

About a decade later, Faye published her memoirs and sensationally wrote off the whole movie as having been a joke in the first place.

'The film was really just a send-up, a spoof, and I had a lot of fun with Selena,' she wrote, noting some 'great moments' with her sidekick played by Brenda Vaccaro.

'Unfortunately, a movie's success

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