Baby defies odds to survive after being born with her organs the wrong way round

A baby girl has defied 'all the odds' to survive after she was born with her organs all the wrong way round.

Ria Moreno has a rare condition, called situs inversus, which means her major organs are mirrored from their normal positions.

Doctors also discovered she had congenital heart disease when she was born - and she needed a stent fitting when she was just seven days old.

However, the stent failed just months later and her parents Amelia and Julian - who had been trying to conceive for five years - were told she was 'going to die'.

But, now nine months old, Ria, who is living in London with her family, has pulled through and is continuing to defy the odds.   

Ria Moreno has a rare condition, called situs inversus, which means her major organs were mirrored from their normal positions

Ria Moreno has a rare condition, called situs inversus, which means her major organs were mirrored from their normal positions

Doctors also discovered she had congenital heart disease when she was born - and she needed a stent fitting when she was just seven days old (pictured recently)

Doctors also discovered she had congenital heart disease when she was born - and she needed a stent fitting when she was just seven days old (pictured recently)

However, the stent failed just months later and her parents Amelia and Julian - who had been trying to conceive for five years - were told she was 'going to die' (pictured in hospital)

However, the stent failed just months later and her parents Amelia and Julian - who had been trying to conceive for five years - were told she was 'going to die' (pictured in hospital)

Ms Moreno, said: 'Ria is a genuine miracle. After all the IVF and years of trying it was amazing to see her for the first time.

'But things quickly took a turn for the worse as she turned blue. We were told she had situs inverses which caused her organs to be on the wrong side of her body.

'She is now nine months old and has defied all the odds to still be alive.

'Even though we are extremely lucky Ria could deteriorate at any time so we have to always be vigilant.' 

Ms Moreno, who was living in Qatar at the time, had a high-risk pregnancy and was given an emergency C-section at 42 weeks.

It was then that she and her partner, 35, were given the crushing news that Ria had complex congenital heart disorder and situs inversus.

But, now nine months old, Ria, who is living in London with her family, has pulled through and is continuing to defy the odds (pictured with her parents Amelia and Julian)

But, now nine months old, Ria, who is living in London with her family, has pulled through and is continuing to defy the odds (pictured with her parents Amelia and Julian)

Ms Moreno, who was living in Qatar at the time, had a high-risk pregnancy and was given an emergency C-section at 42 weeks (Ria's parents are pictured with her in hospital)

Ms Moreno, who was living in Qatar at the time, had a high-risk pregnancy and was given an emergency C-section at 42 weeks (Ria's parents are pictured with her in hospital)

In July, Ria was whisked away for emergency surgery for the second time in her short life after going into hospital for a routine scan (pictured with her mother)

In July, Ria was whisked away for emergency surgery for the second time in her short life after going into hospital for a routine scan (pictured with her mother)

WHAT IS SITUS INVERSUS? 

The normal arrangement of internal organs is known as situs solitus while situs inversus is generally the mirror image of situs solitus - where the major visceral organs are reversed or mirrored from their normal positions.

Situs inversus totalis involves complete transposition (right to left reversal) of all of the abdominal organs.

The heart is not in its usual position in the left chest, but is on the right, a condition known as dextrocardia (literally, right-hearted).

Because the

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