Beer before wine WON'T make you feel fine: Order of drink makes no difference ...

Beer before wine and you'll feel fine, is how the tactical tippler thinks - but the old adage appears to be a myth.

In a less than surprising revelation, researchers found hangovers are just as bad, regardless of what order you drink your drinks.

Scientists gave alcoholic drinks to 90 volunteers in different combinations in a laboratory experiment on two separate nights.

Some were asked to drink two and a half pints of Carlsberg, followed by four large glasses of white wine. A second group started with wine before beer.

Researchers had to control the drunk participants, who were singing and dancing, with a megaphone. They were sent to bed in the lab at 1am.

Participants were asked about their hangover the following day and given a score on a so-called Acute Hangover Scale.

The findings, led by a team at Cambridge University, indicated that no matter how you order your drinks, if you drink too much you are still likely to be ill.

Dr Kai Hensel, one of the researchers, said: 'The vomiting rate was a little higher than I’d have thought. But they enjoyed it.'

The order you drink makes no difference to your hangover, according to Cambridge scientists

The order you drink makes no difference to your hangover, according to Cambridge scientists

Scientists gave alcoholic drinks to 90 volunteers in a laboratory experiment on two separate nights. Some were asked to drink two and a half pints of Carlsberg, followed by four large glasses of white wine. A second group started with wine before beer

Scientists gave alcoholic drinks to 90 volunteers in a laboratory experiment on two separate nights. Some were asked to drink two and a half pints of Carlsberg, followed by four large glasses of white wine. A second group started with wine before beer

In an interview with The Times, Dr Hensel added: 'They had a great time but it was a highly controlled scientific setting.'

Volunteers were split into three groups, with the first drinking around two and a half pints of beer followed by four large glasses of white wine.

The second group had the same amount of alcohol but in reverse order, and subjects in the third, control group had either only beer or only wine.

The Acute Hangover Scale is based on factors including thirst, fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, stomach ache, increased heart rate and loss of appetite.

The volunteers, aged between 19 and 40, were asked about their well being at regular intervals and kept under medical supervision overnight. 

SHY PEOPLE MORE LIKELY TO SUFFER WITH 'HANGXIETY'

A study of 97 adults found highly shy people are more likely to become anxious when nursing a hangover after a night of heavy drinking.

It also revealed drinking around six units of alcohol reduced anxiety in extremely coy people, who may use booze to help release their inhibitions.

Researchers at the University of Exeter sat in on a social event attended by participants, who were aged between 18 and 53. 

At the get-together participants were told to either drink or stay sober.

Participants were breathalysed and completed a questionnaire that assessed their anxiety levels on the evening and the next day.  

Results revealed a link between shyness and suffering from anxiety after a night of drinking, which the researchers named 'hangxiety'. 

There was a moderate association between experiencing hangxiety and suffering from an alcohol use disorder (AUD) but only among those in the 'high-shy group'.   

Problem drinkers have previously scored higher on measures of shyness, which suggests a link between the trait

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