Woman, 30, with cystic fibrosis is disappointed after being denied NHS funding ...

A woman with cystic fibrosis who is unable to have children has been left disappointed after being denied NHS funding for IVF and surrogacy. 

Sophie Gannon, 30, who has already had a double lung transplant, has been told by doctors she could die if she gets pregnant. 

Therefore, the school office data controller and her partner, Josh Thomas, 28, must use IVF and a surrogate mother. 

However, because the couples' fertility is not affected, they do not fall under the criteria for the NHS to pay for IVF.   

The desperate couple are now fundraising for the costs of their private treatment - at least £8,000 - before finding a surrogate. 

Sophie Gannon, 30, and her partner Josh Thomas, 28, must use IVF and a surrogate mother to have the child they have always dreamed of 

Sophie Gannon, 30, and her partner Josh Thomas, 28, must use IVF and a surrogate mother to have the child they have always dreamed of 

After a lung transplant due to cystic fibrosis, Ms Gannon has been told by doctors she cannot go through pregnancy, as there is a risk she 'could die' due to the pressure on her body

After a lung transplant due to cystic fibrosis, Ms Gannon has been told by doctors she cannot go through pregnancy, as there is a risk she 'could die' due to the pressure on her body

Ms Gannon was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at birth. Pictured, using a nebuliser as a child

Ms Gannon was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at birth. Pictured, using a nebuliser as a child

Ms Gannon said: 'We need to raise between £7,000 to 8,000 for making the embryos and then up to £2,000 each time an embryo is transferred to a surrogate.

'We have to find our own surrogate but we won't give up, surrogacy is our only chance of having a baby.'

Ms Gannon was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at birth, a life-shortening, inherited disease that causes the body to produce thick mucus.

WHEN IS IVF OFFERED AND HOW CAN YOU GET A SURROGATE?

IVF is only offered on the NHS if certain criteria are met. If you don't meet these criteria, you may need to pay for private treatment.

In 2013, the NICE published new fertility guidelines that made recommendations about who should have access to the treatment on the NHS in England and Wales.

However, individual NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups make the final decision about who can access it in their local area, and their criteria may be stricter.

According to NICE, women aged under 40 should be offered three cycles of IVF treatment on the NHS if:

They've been trying to get pregnant through regular unprotected sex for two years, or they've not been able to get pregnant after 12 cycles of artificial insemination.

If you turn 40 during treatment, the current cycle will be completed, but further cycles should not be offered.

If tests show that IVF is the only treatment likely to help you get pregnant, you should be referred for IVF straight away.

Surrogacy is legal in the UK, however, it cannot be advertised.

If conception is taking place at a fertility clinic, there will be a cost.

No third parties are allowed to be involved and surrogates can only receive payments to cover expenses incurred as a result of being pregnant.

The condition, of which 30,000 people are living with in the US and 10,400 in the UK, affects the lungs and digestive and reproductive systems in particular.

At the age of 23, in 2011, Ms Gannon underwent a life-saving double lung transplant.

But it would crush her dreams of having a child - due to complications, her body would be under more strain during pregnancy. 

Lung transplant recipients have an increased risk of maternal and neonatal complications associated with pregnancy, with a risk of premature birth and rejection of the new lungs.  

Writing on a blog, Ms Gannon said she spoke to a consultant in June 2018: 'They strongly advised that I do not get pregnant. I know many CF patients who have had babies and this just depends on how well you

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