Violence affects 60% of teen relationships and 150 young people were killed by ...

Between 2003 and 2016, 150 adolescents and teenagers were killed by someone they were dating in the US, a disturbing study reveals.  

Violence is all too common in relationships between American teens, affecting some 60 percent of youth relationships. 

The vast majority of the young people who are victimized by their romantic partners are young women, and in many states they don't have access to the same protections that adult victims do.  

As violence continues to claim the lives of mostly low-income youth in the US, public health experts at the University of Washington are urging health care providers to check in with their young patients to better screen for violent relationships. 

Between 2003 and 2016, 150 adolescents and teenagers were killed by someone they were dating or who wanted to date them, and 60 percent who had dated at all had experience violence from a romantic partner, a new JAMA study found (file image)

Between 2003 and 2016, 150 adolescents and teenagers were killed by someone they were dating or who wanted to date them, and 60 percent who had dated at all had experience violence from a romantic partner, a new JAMA study found (file image) 

Americans don't commit more crimes than people living in other countries, according to previous research, but their crimes are more likely to prove deadly. 

Of all the potential explanations for American violence, one variable distinguishes crime in the US: guns. 

Nearly 30 people per every one million Americans died by firearm in 2012, according to the Human Development Index. 

And these gun deaths are not limited to adults. 

Over 60 percent of the 150 minors killed by intimate partners between 2003 and 2016 were shot to death.  

In fact, the new study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, revealed that violence is prevalent among youth and shares much in common with violence in adult relationships. 

The vast majority of under-18s killed by romantic partners were women (90 percent) and 58 percent were minorities. 

Rejection was the most common underlying reason for altercations, according to the new study. 

Over a quarter (27 percent) of the victims were killed by someone they had ended a relationship with or by someone whose

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Teens who spend more time on social media suffer worse depression
NEXT health care Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids slams Juul's 'fake apology'