British doctors launch world's first handbook for child blast injuries

Saed, seven, lost his legs when he was just a baby. 

He was critically injured by a piece of shrapnel when he was one-and-a-half, after his family were caught in an airstrike as they fled Aleppo. 

Two of his siblings were also killed in the blast. Without specialist doctors all the local doctors were able to do for Saed was some simple stitches.

As a result, he has now been forced to undergo an operation nearly every year to shave off sections of bone to stop it growing through his skin. He is in constant pain.

Saed, seven, lost his legs as a toddler when his family were caught in an airstrike as they fled Aleppo

Saed, seven, lost his legs as a toddler when his family were caught in an airstrike as they fled Aleppo

His mother, Summer, said: 'When the strike happened I fell unconscious immediately. 

'When I woke up I saw my daughter was dead on my shoulder. She had a massive head injury.

'My only thought after that was to get my children to hospital immediately. My youngest was on my lap and his legs were blown off. 

'My other son had part of his intestines out. My five-year old son was still alive then but by the time they got to the hospital he died.

'The hospital was not very well equipped. There were planes all around it. They just stitched Saed up and they gave me first aid treatment for my wounds.

'Saed has been very affected by his injuries. When he was around two-years-old he used to say 'I don't like planes, they took my legs'.

'Every year or year and a half they have to open his wounds and saw his bone down.

'He loves motorcycles and cars. His father has a motorcycle and he takes him on it. He wants to be an eye doctor when he grows up.'

Alia, 10, lost her right leg when she was four in Ghouta, Syria. 

She was injured while playing in an empty car with her cousin and a friend, which

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