Hope for Parkinson's as researchers REVERSE symptoms in mice

Hope for Parkinson's as researchers REVERSE symptoms in mice by giving them a molecule that attacks a protein that slowly accumulates in the brain Parkinson's UK hope the finding could 'prove crucial' in halting the condition Parkinson’s affects one in 500 people, and around 127,000 people in the UK  There is currently no cure and no way of slowing down the progression of it Researchers at the University of Cambridge tested the effects of anle138b 

By Stephen Matthews Health Editor For Mailonline

Published: 01:00 BST, 5 June 2019 | Updated: 01:00 BST, 5 June 2019

View
comments

Hope of finding a way to halt Parkinson's has been raised as scientists believe they have discovered how to stop it in its tracks.

Giving mice a protein-busting molecule reversed signs of the progressive condition in rodents treated before the disorder took hold. 

The molecule, called anle138b, halted the build-up of a toxic protein clumps in the brain - considered a hallmark of Parkinson's. 

Parkinson's UK hope the discovery could 'prove crucial' in stopping the inevitable progression of the condition in patients. 

Giving mice a protein-busting molecule reversed signs of the progressive condition in rodents treated before the disorder took hold (stock)

Giving mice a protein-busting molecule reversed signs of the progressive condition in rodents treated before the disorder took hold (stock)

Parkinson’s affects one in 500 people, and around 127,000 people in the UK and one million in the US live with the condition.  

It causes muscle stiffness, slowness of movement, tremors, sleep disturbance, chronic fatigue, an impaired quality of life and can lead to severe disability. 

There is currently no cure and no way of stopping the progression of the disease, but hundreds of scientific trials are underway to try and change that.

Researchers at the University of Cambridge tested the effects of anle138b in mice when they nine months old.

By this time, the rodents had lower levels of dopamine, causing them symptoms similar to those seen in adults.

For instance, the mice had slightly different gait. In humans, this often causes 'shuffling' of feet when walking.  

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT One year of obesity slashes women's chances of surviving cancer