Woman who suffered a decade of 'poor' dentistry has been awarded £18,000 

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A mother who suffered a decade of poor dental care preceding her miscarriage has been awarded £18,000. 

Kenza Hancock, 35, first reported toothache to her dentist Dr Vachik Avakian of Cecil Street Dental Surgery, Plymouth, in early 2008. 

Dr Vachik Avakian allegedly failed to spot and treat tooth decay adequately, which led to years of pain and more dental work.

After multiple attempts to address the problem, Mrs Hancock underwent a failed tooth extraction while nine weeks pregnant in 2017. 

A second dentist finished the job two weeks later and when Mrs Hancock got home, she was rushed to hospital suffering a miscarriage.  

Mrs Hancock, from Callington, Cornwall, believes the 'never-ending trauma' on her body from the extraction attempt caused her to lose her unborn baby. 

The NHS denies that such a link exists, saying a woman's emotional state during pregnancy does not increase their risk of miscarriage, and encourage visiting the dentist for check-ups during pregnancy. 

Dr Avakian did not admit liability for the case which was settled out of court. 

Kenza Hancock, 35, suffered a decade of botched dental work and has been given a payout of £18,000. Pictured with her daughter Isabella, seven, and one-year-old Leia, with husband Jonathan, 39

Kenza Hancock, 35, suffered a decade of botched dental work and has been given a payout of £18,000. Pictured with her daughter Isabella, seven, and one-year-old Leia, with husband Jonathan, 39

Analysis of her dental records by Dental Law Partnership revealed Dr Avakian had failed to treat decay on two of her teeth  and the fillings and root canal treatment were also inadequate. Pictured, Mrs Hancock's swelling after the tooth extraction in June 2017

Analysis of her dental records by Dental Law Partnership revealed Dr Avakian had failed to treat decay on two of her teeth  and the fillings and root canal treatment were also inadequate. Pictured, Mrs Hancock's swelling after the tooth extraction in June 2017

Solicitors said Dr Avakian did not use reasonable skill and care when attempting to extract her wisdom tooth, pictured on the right

Solicitors said Dr Avakian did not use reasonable skill and care when attempting to extract her wisdom tooth, pictured on the right

Mrs Hancock is mother to Isabella, seven, and one-year-old Leia, with husband Jonathan, 39, who works for a concrete drilling company. 

She contacted the dental negligence solicitors at Dental Law Partnership, which alleged Dr Avakian had failed to use reasonable skill and care when treating Mrs Hancock. 

Mrs Hancock, who works in a pharmacy, said: 'In early 2008 I was suffering from toothache so made an appointment with Dr Avakian.

'He'd been my dentist for a long time so I trusted him to resolve the situation. I thought it would be fairly routine.

'I had to go back to see him the following month. This time he told me I needed root canal treatment and another filling.

'Again, I trusted Dr Avakian knew what he was doing and thought this would be the end of it.'

Mrs Hancock said she trusted her dentist who she had been visiting for a long time

Mrs Hancock said she trusted her dentist who she had been visiting for a long time 

Mrs Hancock, from Callington, Cornwall, believes the 'the never-ending trauma' on her body from the extraction attempt caused her to lose her unborn baby with Mr Hancock

Mrs Hancock, from Callington, Cornwall, believes the 'the never-ending trauma' on her body from the extraction attempt caused her to lose her unborn baby with Mr Hancock 

CAN TRAUMA OR DENTAL WORK CAUSE A MISCARRIAGE? 

There is no evidence that stress can cause a miscarriage and the NHS list this as a misconception about early pregnancy miscarriage. 

Dentist work is also safe - and encouraged - while pregnant. 

Obstetricians generally do not accept that healthy women can lose healthy babies solely because of stress, although some studies on mice have suggested so. 

Scientists at University College London and Zhejang University in China found that the risk of miscarriage was significantly higher in women with a long history of stress in their lives. 

If a miscarriage happens during the first trimester of pregnancy, the first three months, it's usually because there is a problem with the unborn baby. About 75 per cent of miscarriages happen in this period.

After that, it may be a result of underlying health conditions in the mother.

Late miscarriages may also be

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