Woman had her hip replaced at 28 after begging for the procedure unable to get ...

A woman has had her hip replaced at 28 after years of pain and struggling to get out of bed without help.

Loretta Hood, from Leicester, was initially told she was too young, despite doctors being able to see the extent of damage to the bone.

Miss Hood was born with a deformed hip, which was discovered aged nine months when her parents noticed she was dragging her leg behind her.

After having surgery at the age of one to place the ball of her hip into the socket, she didn't have pain for 12 years.

But by the age of 20, when her knee started to lock in place and dislocate, she was diagnosed with early arthritis.

The pressure on her hip caused it to wear down, causing the agonising condition that is most common in those aged over 65.

After insisting the hip replacement would change her life, it took place in November 2018, and now Miss Hood feels like a normal woman in her 20s.

Loretta Hood had her hip replaced at the age of 28 after years of pain and struggling to get out of bed without help. Pictured after her surgery at her home in Leicester

Loretta Hood had her hip replaced at the age of 28 after years of pain and struggling to get out of bed without help. Pictured after her surgery at her home in Leicester 

Miss Hood was initially told she was too young to have her hip replaced despite doctors seeing the amount of damage present in her hip. Pictured, in hospital

Miss Hood was initially told she was too young to have her hip replaced despite doctors seeing the amount of damage present in her hip. Pictured, in hospital

Miss Hood was diagnosed with congenital dislocation of the left hip, caused by the ball and socket not forming correctly. She was put in traction, which means her legs were raised, for three weeks before having surgery at the age of one

Miss Hood was diagnosed with congenital dislocation of the left hip, caused by the ball and socket not forming correctly. She was put in traction, which means her legs were raised, for three weeks before having surgery at the age of one

After insisting the hip replacement would change her life, it took place in November 2018. Pictured, after the staples were taken out

After insisting the hip replacement would change her life, it took place in November 2018. Pictured, after the staples were taken out

Miss Hood, a technical services customer coordinator, said: 'Regardless of age, it's important to push for surgery when you feel you need it.

'To be pain-free feels incredible and it's only now that that I really understand the extent of what I was putting up with.' 

When she was a baby, Miss Hood's parents started to think something was wrong with her leg as she showed signs of pain and would drag her left leg behind her while learning to walk. 

Miss Hood was diagnosed with congenital dislocation of the left hip, caused by developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), where the ball and socket of the hip don't form correctly.

Upon referral to an orthopaedics department, Miss Hood was put in traction, meaning her legs were hung up to keep them apart.

Traction is to relieve pain and make surgery, which she had three weeks later, easier. 

She said: 'I had hip reduction surgery to place the ball back into the socket, before another operation where they broke the bones to put metal plates in the leg.

'After a year, the metal plates were removed, and I was left with two large scars down my leg. For many years after, I didn't experience any further issues with my left hip or my leg.' 

Miss Hood's parents started to think something was wrong with her leg as she showed signs of pain and would drag her left leg behind her while learning to walk. Pictured in traction

Miss Hood's parents started to think something was wrong with her leg as she showed signs of pain and would drag her left leg behind her while learning to walk. Pictured in traction

After having surgery at the age of one to place the ball into the socket, Miss Hood didn't have pain for 12 years. Pictured recently

After having surgery at the age of one to place the ball into the socket, Miss Hood didn't have pain for 12 years. Pictured recently 

Miss Hood has had various procedures over the years to try and treat her pain. She was diagnosed with arthritis at the age of 20. Pictured in hospital, unknown date

Miss Hood has had various procedures over the years to try and treat her pain. She was diagnosed with arthritis at the age of 20. Pictured in hospital, unknown date

CAN YOU BE TOO YOUNG FOR A HIP REPLACEMENT?  

Hip and knee replacements are most common in the age between 70 and 79 most commonly due to wear and tear, condition such as osteoarthritis and falls.

Adults of any age can have one, the NHS says. But because it is a major surgery, it is normally only recommended if other treatments, such as physiotherapy or steroid injections, haven't helped reduce pain or improve mobility.

The artificial joints are only built to last for around 15 years, with multiple replacements becoming progressively more difficult and less successful.

The total number of hip replacements in under 30s in 2017 was 185, representing under one per cent of patients, according to the National Joint Registry. 

For 12 years, Miss Hood didn't experience any further issues and was able to start dancing at five years old. 

But then, in 2004, Miss Hood began experiencing a 'clicky knee'. Her knee would often dislocate, and her leg locked if she sat in one position for too long.

She said: 'I didn't realise it was connected to my hip at the time. My knee dislocated quite frequently, but after the third time, the hospital showed me how to push my own knee back in.

'It happened repeatedly before I was referred back to orthopaedics. I had to give up dancing because this was putting more strain on the hip and in turn the left leg and knee.

'I was experiencing deep pains in the bone, sharp twinges, arthritic pain and clicking. 

'My leg would often get stuck, and if I was on my own, I would have to try and crawl out of the position I was in.' 

In 2011, Miss Hood was diagnosed with arthritis at 20, despite initially being told to expect this diagnosis in her forties. 

Arthritis most often develops in adults who are in their mid-40s or older. But, in the UK, about 15,000 children and young people are affected. The most common form, juvenile arthritis, affects nearly 300,000 children in the US. DDH can lead to arthritis.

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