The dangers of second-hand booze: 1 in 5 Americans have been hurt by another ...

The dangers of second-hand booze: 1 in 5 Americans have been hurt by another person's drinking, study finds The study by the Public Health Institute in California found 53 million Americans had been hurt by people drinking They were either physically or emotionally hurt, or suffered damage to their property, by drunk people The researchers say it's likely a woeful underestimate because abused people are less able to take part in these studies 

By Mia De Graaf Health Editor For Dailymail.com and Dailymail.com Reporter

Published: 14:45 BST, 1 July 2019 | Updated: 14:51 BST, 1 July 2019

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A fifth of US adults have been abused or hurt by someone drinking alcohol, according to a new report.

The study, published today, found 53 million people said they had been harmed at least once by someone under the influence of alcohol in 2015.

Some suffered physical abuse, some emotional, some financial, and some had their belongings trashed.

While men were more likely harmed by a stranger, women were much more likely to be hurt by a loved-one, they found. 

Lead author Katherine Karriker-Jaffe at the Public Health Institute in California told CNN this number of people affected is likely a woeful underestimate.

Women were more likely to report physical abuse, family problems, financial trouble, or being a passenger in a vehicle with a drunk driver (file image)

Women were more likely to report physical abuse, family problems, financial trouble, or being a passenger in a vehicle with a drunk driver (file image)

'One thing to think about with the one-in-five number is that it is only limited to a snapshot in time of about a year,' Karriker-Jaffe, whose paper was published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, told CNN.

'So probably more people have actually been harmed by

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