Health chiefs team up with Disney to create games for children to stay active ...

Health bosses have launched a series of Disney-themed exercise games aimed at young children in their latest bid to curb Britain's spiraling childhood obesity crisis. 

The 28 team-based activities are inspired by family favourites such as Toy Story, The Lion King, Frozen and The Incredibles. 

Information packs with how to play the 10-minute games will be handed out across 16,500 state schools in England over summer.

Pupils will be encouraged to take the games, such as Elsa's Freeze Tag, home and play them to stay active during the holidays.   

Public Health England hope the games will push children towards the 60 minutes of exercise they need every day.

Health bosses have launched a series of Disney-themed exercise games aimed at young children in their latest bid to curb Britain's spiraling childhood obesity crisis. One of the games is Elsa's Freeze Tag - based on the 2013 animated hit

Health bosses have launched a series of Disney-themed exercise games aimed at young children in their latest bid to curb Britain's spiraling childhood obesity crisis. One of the games is Elsa's Freeze Tag - based on the 2013 animated hit

The 28 team-based activities are inspired by family favourites such as Toy Story, The Lion King, Frozen and The Incredibles. Each game should be played for at least 10 minutes

The 28 team-based activities are inspired by family favourites such as Toy Story, The Lion King, Frozen and The Incredibles. Each game should be played for at least 10 minutes 

The NHS says youngsters between five and 18 need a minimum of one hour of exercise - ranging from moderate to vigorous - each day. 

This can include cycling and playground activities to running and playing football or tennis. 

According to NHS figures, just over a third – about 170,000 – of the half a million children who left primary school last year were overweight to some degree. 

One in five leavers were obese, equivalent to 111,290 pupils. This includes 4.1 per cent, equivalent to 22,646 pupils, who were severely obese.  

Youngsters are twice as likely to be dangerously obese aged 11 as when they started in reception class aged four.

This is despite hundreds of millions being poured into healthier school meals, new PE equipment and extra sports coaches.

The NHS recommends at least an hour of physical activity ranging from moderate activity, such as cycling and playground games, to vigorous activity, such as running and tennis. 

The games are being rolled out as part of the Change4Life 10 Minute Shake Up campaign by Public Health England, Disney UK and Sports England. 

Public Health England said the games help count towards the 60 minutes of exercise children need every day. Some of the activities are based on characters from The Lion King

Public Health England said the games help count towards the 60 minutes of exercise children need every day. Some of the activities are based on characters from The Lion King 

Games include an Incredibles-themed dodgeball and a Toy Story variation of hide and seek

Games include an Incredibles-themed dodgeball and a Toy Story variation of hide and seek

Elsa's Freeze Tag, inspired by Frozen, sees one youngster play the Disney princess while the rest of the group run away.

If 'tagged', players have to stand frozen in one spot with their legs wide open and wait for someone to crawl under them to free them. 

Buzz's Space Run, based on the space ranger from the Toy Story series, requires players to stand in a line with their arms stretched out wide like Buzz's wings.

They then have to do three laps - one facing forward, one backwards and a third by sidestepping. 

Other games include an Incredibles-themed dodgeball and a Toy Story variation of hide and seek. 

HOW FAT ARE BRITISH CHILDREN?

English children are fatter than ever – official data revealed in October that one in every 25 10 to 11-year-olds are severely obese, the fattest possible category.

And out of around 556,000 children of primary school-leaving age in the UK, 170,000 are overweight to some degree, figures showed in May last year.

More than one in five 11-year-olds are obese – equivalent to around 111,000 children – and being so fat means they are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer or have a stroke.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health say children should be weighed every year at school because 'danger is on the horizon' and the UK is lagging behind the rest of the EU in tackling obesity.

Experts have also warned children gain weight 'at a drastic rate' when they're at school. 

Sugar in food is known to be contributing to the swelling waistlines of children, with

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