Experts reveal the seven ways restaurants can nudge people to eat more ...

Make dishes smaller and offer diners salad not fries: Researchers reveal the SEVEN ways restaurants can nudge people to eat more healthily Two researchers analysed reviews on how people can eat healthier while out The pair have now named the seven most effective 'nudges', as they call them The experts wrote: 'A nudge gently pushes us towards making better choices 

By Pierre Chandon and Romain Cadario For The Conversation

Published: 16:07 BST, 4 July 2019 | Updated: 16:09 BST, 4 July 2019

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Making dishes smaller and asking diners if they want salad instead of fries are just two ways restaurants could promote healthier diets.

That's according to two marketing researchers who analysed reviews on how people could eat healthier when dining out.

They have now named the seven most effective 'nudges', as they call them, saying they could help 'tackle the obesity crisis'.

Pierre Chandon, of INSEAD-Sorbonne Université Behavioural Lab, and Dr Romain Cadario, of Boston University, revealed their tips in The Conversation.  

They wrote: 'A nudge gently pushes us towards making better choices without resorting to economic incentives or restricting our freedom of choice. 

'Reorganising a menu or a grocery shelf is a nudge. Taxing sodas or banning energy drinks is not.'  

Two marketing researchers analysed reviews on how people could eat healthier when dining out. They have now named the seven most effective 'nudges', as they call them, saying they could help 'tackle the obesity crisis'

Two marketing researchers analysed reviews on how people could eat healthier when dining out. They have now named the seven most effective 'nudges', as they call them, saying they could help 'tackle the obesity crisis'

Use descriptive labels

The facts alone don't seem to move the dial very much in terms of making healthy choices. 

This is nutritional information with no colour-coding or symbols to help people interpret the numbers, and we don't see any real change with this nudge. 

Expected calorie reduction = five sugar cubes. 

Put healthy foods in the middle of the menu 

Another nudge that speaks to our brains is one that puts the healthiest product in the most visible place – at eye level on a shelf or on the best place in the middle of a menu. 

Still, it didn't have a significant impact on making better choices. 

Expected calorie reduction = seven sugar cubes. 

Use red to indicate foods are unhealthy

When we know how healthy something is in relation to something else, in the form of a smiley face or traffic light food labelling, the information has some impact on our

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