Woman who had two liver transplants and was told she'd NEVER have kids gives ...

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A woman who had two liver transplants and was told she'd never have children was shocked when she was admitted to the hospital with a liver infection and found out she was six weeks pregnant.

Hannah Rosenfelder, 29, from Broomfield, Colorado, was born with biliary atresia, a liver disease which causes the narrowing and blockage of bile ducts.

She had her first liver transplant at 15 years old and her second one at 25 years old.

Rosenfelder was always told it was unlikely she'd have children because her body couldn't handle pregnancy. 

However, in March 2017, she went to the hospital with a liver infection and discovered - after a routine pregnancy test - that she and her husband were expecting.

Doctors didn't believe she would successfully carry the baby to term but, in October, Rosenfelder welcomed her daughter, Hadley, at 37 weeks.  

Hannah Rosenfelder, 29, from Broomfield, Colorado, was born with biliary atresia. Pictured: Rosenfelder holding her newborn daughter, October 2017

Hannah Rosenfelder, 29, from Broomfield, Colorado, was born with biliary atresia. Pictured: Rosenfelder holding her newborn daughter, October 2017

Biliary atresia is a liver disease in which the bile ducts to become blocked, causing the liver to scar. Pictured: Rosenfelder

Rosenfelder (pictured, in the hospital) had her first liver transplant at 15 years old

Biliary atresia is a liver disease in which the bile ducts to become blocked, causing the liver to scar. Rosenfelder (in the hospital, left and right) had her first liver transplant at 15 years old

Rosenfelder was diagnosed with biliary atresia when she was six weeks old after her mom took her to the doctor when she became jaundiced.  

Biliary atresia is a rare disease that occurs when the bile ducts - which normally lets bile drain from the liver to the intestines for excretion - become blocked.

This means bile remains in the liver, where it damages liver cells and causes liver scarring, known as cirrhosis. 

The first signs are jaundice - a yellowing of the skin due to the buildup of bile - which appears between two and six weeks old. 

It occurs in about one in every 12,000 infants in the US, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

The first treatment is called the Kasai procedure, which involves moving the bile ducts outside of the liver and replacing them with part of the small intestine.

Even if the procedure is successful, many children will slowly develop complications and need a liver transplant. 

Rosenfelder said she missed a lot of school days because of her illness and, when she did attend school, she often had an IV in her hand - making her feel like she didn't fit in.

'I required my first transplant at 15, but the actual surgery didn't really hit me until I got the call,' she said.

'I was excited that this could mean an end to my hospital stays and a fresh start to life that I wanted badly.' 

Rosenfelder's bile ducts became blocked again and she was put on the transplant list once more at age 23. Pictured: Rosenfelder in the hospital for her second liver transplant

She had her second transplant at age 25. Pictured Rosenfelder recovering after her second liver transplant

Rosenfelder's bile ducts became blocked again and she was put on the transplant list once more at age 23. She had her second transplant at age 25. Pictured, left and right: Rosenfelder in the hospital for her second liver transplant

Doctors told Rosenfelder that it was unlikely she'd have children because her body could likely not handle a pregnancy. Pictured: Rosenfelder, right, with her husband, Ryan, and their daughter, Hadley

Doctors told Rosenfelder that it was unlikely she'd have children because her body could likely not handle a pregnancy. Pictured: Rosenfelder, right, with her husband, Ryan, and their daughter, Hadley

Rosenfelder said that after she received her new liver, she finally felt like she had

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