11-year-old's lemonade stand shut down by Illinois health officials

Illinois officials shut down what they considered a pressing health and sanitation threat in the small town of Kankakee: an 11-year-old girl's lemonade stand. 

Hayli Martenez set up shop in front of her home, proudly displaying the lemonade sign she'd painstakingly painted and bejeweled with 'HayliBug Lemonadez' to sell refreshing drinks and raise money to pay for college in a few years. 

But health officials claimed the stand was a health code violation because Hayli's mother, Iva, fell behind on some of her bills - including those for water and sewage. 

The local health official charged that Hayli had 'crossed a line' by selling fruit and vegetable smoothies for which she needed a permit and running water. 

Hayli was left frustrated, and her mother saddened that her daughter couldn't even sell lemonade and neighbors even donated water so the little girl could keep her stand open. 

Hayli Martenez (left), 11, was selling lemonade outside her Kankakee, Illinois home - until health officials said she'd 'crossed a line' selling smoothies because her mother is behind on bills so the home doesn't have running water

Hayli Martenez (left), 11, was selling lemonade outside her Kankakee, Illinois home - until health officials said she'd 'crossed a line' selling smoothies because her mother is behind on bills so the home doesn't have running water 

Little Hayli hoped she could help keep her neighbors cool and hydrated in the mid-July heat while earning some cash for college with a good old fashioned lemonade stand. 

But she didn't know that health inspectors would take issue with that. 

US states require permits for any vendors of food and drinks - even ones too young drive or vote (Unless they're selling fruit pies, and certain jellies, jams, preserves butters, herbs and teas. Those are okay in Illinois). 

So on July 20, the authorities came for Hayli's illicit business.  

Hayli didn't have running water for her temporary stand because her mother, Iva, was about $200 short on her payments for water and sewage, CBS 2 reported. 

It's likely not an uncommon problem in Kankanee, a town of just 26,216, of which 74 percent live below the poverty line. 

Iva told CBS 2 that she and her daughter had been drinking and using bottled water for sanitary purposes since their water had been shut

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