Heart disease death rates are highest in the poorest, most obese Southern US ...

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more
() Heart disease death rates are highest in the poorest, most obese Southern US counties, study finds Researchers looked at data from more than 3,100 US counties  For every 1% poorer a county was, there was an increase of 5 heart failure deaths per 100,000 people The strongest link between heart failure mortality and poverty was seen in Southern counties High rates of diabetes and obesity were found to explain most of the correlation between poverty and deaths from heart failure 

By Mary Kekatos Health Reporter For Dailymail.com

Published: 15:45 BST, 4 September 2019 | Updated: 22:51 BST, 4 September 2019

View
comments

People living in the poorest counties in the US are at the greatest risk of dying from heart failure of any in the country, a new study says.   

Researchers found that for every one percent poorer a country was, there also an increase of five heart failure deaths per 100,000 people. 

The link between county poverty and deaths from heart failure was mostly attributed to high rates diabetes and obesity, both of which are risk factors for heart disease.

The strongest of this was seen in Southern US counties.

The team, from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, says that if health policies are implemented in poor communities that focus on reducing the prevalence of diabetes and obesity - such as improving diet and exercise - then heart failure death rates may fall, too.

A new study from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, has found that for every one percent increase in county poverty status, there was an increase of five heart failure deaths per 100,000 people (file image)

A new study from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, has found that for every one percent increase in county poverty status, there was an increase of five heart failure deaths per 100,000 people (file image) 

'This study underscores the disparities in healthcare faced by many Americans,' said Dr Jennifer Ellis, chief of cardiothoracic surgery at NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue in New York, who was not involved in the

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT Poor people are 42% less likely to suffer from depression or anxiety if they ...