Fisherman was left on a short-stay ward dying of cancer and family were not ...

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The family of a fisherman who was in hospital dying of cancer for weeks were not told about his diagnosis until after his death.  

Keith Rumley, of Grimsby, had first visited his GP in July 2018 with back pain and was given painkillers on repeated visits.

He was eventually admitted to hospital, where scans revealed he had a metastatic adenocarcinoma. 

But his family claim they were kept in the dark while they visited his bedside until his death certificate revealed the diagnosis. 

Father-of-five Mr Rumley was in so much pain he was unable to speak or even hold his wife's hand in his final few days. 

The hospital, Grimsby's Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital, said an investigation found the correct care was given.

Keith Rumley was left on a short-stay ward dying of cancer for weeks, while his family were not told about his diagnosis until after his death

Keith Rumley was left on a short-stay ward dying of cancer for weeks, while his family were not told about his diagnosis until after his death

Wife Susan Rumley was unable to hold her husband's hand in his last days because he was in so much pain. She says doctors denied he had cancer

Wife Susan Rumley was unable to hold her husband's hand in his last days because he was in so much pain. She says doctors denied he had cancer 

Mr Rumley's wife Susan said: 'He was left there, in a bed, for four solid weeks seeing doctor after doctor. 

'After a week he wasn't awake, wasn't talking, wasn't eating and had to be forced to drink. 

'It got to the stage that, if I even touched his hand, he'd say to me "please let go of my hand". I'd ask why, and he'd say "Because it hurts. Please don't touch me".

'I felt for him because his dignity was taken away. He wasn't there anymore.'  

Mr Rumley had first sought help for his back pain in July 2018, visiting his GP and being given painkillers for it. 

WHAT IS ADENOCARCINOMA?

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that affects the mucus-secreting glands found throughout the body.

It can occur anywhere in the body, with is prevalence varying depending on where it affects.

The disease is most common in the:

Lung - adenocarcinoma is the most common type of non-small cell lung cancer, which makes up 80 per cent of lung cancers Prostate - adenocarcinoma accounts for 99 per cent of all prostate cancers Pancreas Oesophagus - adenocarcinoma is the most common type Colorectal - adenocarcinoma accounts for 95 per cent of colon and rectal cancers Cervix - adenocarcinoma is responsible in more than one in 10 cases 

Adenocarcinoma affects around one in every 100 people diagnosed with cancer of the nose and nasal sinuses. 

Treatment varies on where the cancer grows in the body.

It may include surgery to remove the cancerous tissue.

Radiation and chemotherapy may also be used in combination with surgery.

Source: Cancer Treatment Centers of America  

His daughter Carly said: 'He started having a niggling back pain. He thought maybe he had pulled his back or something like that and eventually went to the GP.

'He went from being a normal bloke doing normal things to the state that he couldn't even sit up, stand up, or go to the toilet.'

After countless visits to the GP and A&E, he was admitted to the Emergency Care Centre at Grimsby's Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital due to his deteriorating health

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