Breast cancer deaths hit a record LOW, analysis reveals

Breast cancer cancer deaths in the UK have plummeted to a record low in Britain, according to an analysis of data.

Statistics show there were 59.8 deaths that occurred from the killer disease out of every 100,000 women in 1989.

In contrast, the Cancer Research UK analysis found the rate was just 33.4 in 2017, which is the most recent available yearly figure. 

Charities have credited better tests and treatment, as well as increased awareness about the common form of cancer. 

Statistics show there were 59.8 deaths that occurred from breast cancer out of every 100,000 women in 1989. In contrast, the Cancer Research UK analysis found the rate was just 33.4 in 2017, which is the most recent available yearly figure

Statistics show there were 59.8 deaths that occurred from breast cancer out of every 100,000 women in 1989. In contrast, the Cancer Research UK analysis found the rate was just 33.4 in 2017, which is the most recent available yearly figure

The data suggests 130,000 breast cancer deaths have been avoided over the past three decades. 

Figures showed 15,600 lost their lives to the disease in 1989 - much higher than the 11,500 who died in 2017. 

Cancer Research UK said improvements in cancer screening, surgery, radiotherapy and new drugs have all had an impact.

It also said more cancers were being picked up earlier, with a quarter of cases being diagnosed through the NHS breast screening programme.

Cancer Research UK's chief executive Michelle Mitchell said: 'These numbers show that research is working.

'And we should celebrate the considerable progress that's been made - but while lives are still being lost, our work is not done yet.

'Our ongoing research into the biology of breast cancer is vital. Diagnosing cancer early can save lives.'

HOW HAS THE DEATH RATE FROM BREAST CANCER CHANGED SINCE 1989? 1989         1990         1991           1992            1993 59.8 57.7 58.1 57.0 54.5 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 53.3 51.7 50.0 48.7 47.6 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 46.5 45.3 45.7 44.8 43.8 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 42.6 42.4 41.7 40.2 39.9 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 38.3 37.4 37.2 36.5 35.4 2014 2015 2016 2017 DEATHS 34.6 33.5 34.1 33.4 PER 100,000 WOMEN

Early signs of breast cancer, which affect both men and women, include a lump or thickening in the breast.

But some people can experience skin changes, breast pain and nipples changing position or leaking fluid.

Survival chances are highest for those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread.

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases.

In the US, around 266,000 people are diagnosed with the disease each year. Around 40,000 deaths are also recorded, according to estimates. 

Cally Palmer, NHS national cancer director said: 'Thanks to huge advances in NHS cancer care over the last 30 years, breast cancer survival is at a record high and deaths are falling faster in this country than the rest of Europe.

'The NHS Long Term Plan will ensure our cancer care remains world leading and we are accelerating action to spot more cancers earlier when the chance of survival is higher, saving tens of thousands more lives every year.'

WHAT IS BREAST CANCER, HOW MANY PEOPLE DOES IT STRIKE AND WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the .

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue it is called an 'invasive' breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with 'carcinoma in situ', where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Is coronavirus in an UBER? Patient tests positive after taking taxi to casualty
NEXT Having more than 10 sexual partners almost DOUBLES women's risk of cancer, ...