E-cigarette 'smoke' gave nearly one in four mice lung cancer

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E-cigarette smoke caused lung cancer in mice: Nearly 25%of study animals developed tumors after a year of nicotine 'vapor' exposure Nine out of 40 mice exposed to a year's worth of e-cigarette vapor developed cancer NYU researchers found nicotine itself may be carcinogenic  But mice exposed to nicotine free 'vapor' did not get lung cancer  

By Natalie Rahhal Deputy Health Editor For Dailymail.com

Published: 20:02 BST, 7 October 2019 | Updated: 20:03 BST, 7 October 2019

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Vaping can cause cancer, at least in animals, according to a new study. 

Although it was initially billed as a safer alternative to smoking - which causes 160,000 cancer deaths a year in the US - vaping gave nearly a quarter of mice exposed to e-cigarette vapor for a year lung cancer. 

E-cigarettes first hit the market about a decade ago, and have since been linked to nearly 20 deaths and over a thousands illnesses in the US, but its too soon for any potential cases of cancer related to the devices to have occurred. 

The 40 mice were exposed to far more of the 'smoke' than a human would be while vaping, but the New York University (NYU) team says their results capture a process that makes nicotine e-cigs carcinogenic. 

However, only one of the 17 animals that were exposed to nicotine-free smoke got cancer, suggesting nicotine itself may be the catalyst for disease. 

New research from NYU suggests that e-cigarette smoke does cause lung cancer. The study found the disease in nine out of 40 exposed animals

New research from NYU suggests that e-cigarette smoke does cause lung cancer. The study found the disease in nine out of 40 exposed animals

Teen vaping has been deemed an 'epidemic' but US health officials, and we're only beginning to learn what immediate and long-term consequences the devices might have for the millions of young people using them.  

Some 80 percent of the Americans who have developed vaping-related lung injuries are under the age of 35, and 16 percent are teenagers 18 or under. 

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