Monthly contraceptive patch could replace the PILL

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Monthly contraceptive patch could replace the Pill - spelling an end to the burden of taking a daily tablet for millions of women Patch injects contraceptive drug via microneedles and the effect lasts a month  90% of women said they preferred it to daily pill in latest trial of placebo patch  Scientists successfully trialled drug in mice and are moving toward human trials 

By Connor Boyd Health Reporter For Mailonline

Published: 19:01 GMT, 6 November 2019 | Updated: 19:01 GMT, 6 November 2019

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A contraceptive patch covered in tiny needles could spare millions of women from having to remember to take the Pill every day.

Nine out of ten women given the device which sticks to the skin said they preferred using it to a daily tablet.

However, scientists only gave the women a placebo patch - and not one containing an actual contraceptive.

Tests of the same device, the size of a 50 pence piece - or a US quarter, have found it boosted levels of hormones needed to prevent pregnancy in mice. 

In theory, the patch slowly releases levonorgestrel into the blood over 30 days and is replaced every month.

It differs from existing forms of contraceptive patch in that it uses tiny needles to dissolve the drug into the bloodstream.

Scientists have created a patch which sticks to the skin and slowly releases a contraceptive drug into women's bloodstream over 30 days

Scientists have created a patch which sticks to the skin and slowly releases a contraceptive drug into women's bloodstream over 30 days

The device, around the size of a 50 pence piece, plants tiny microneedles under the skin where they slowly biodegrade and release the contraceptive

The device, around the size of a 50 pence piece, plants tiny microneedles under the skin where they slowly biodegrade and release the contraceptive

It plants tiny, biodegradable microneedles under the skin which kick in after just five seconds to release the contraceptive, and is the first of its kind to work this way.

Georgia Institute of Technology scientists found the needles safely dissolved in their trials on mice, it was revealed in January. 

But the academics are one step closer to getting it to market after receiving positive feedback from women as part of their latest research.

None of the 10 women involved in the study revealed they had any problem applying the patch to their skin.

The findings, which push the device one step closer to human trials, were published in the journal Science Advances.

The researchers, including Mark Prausnitz, a professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering, say the method could be a game-changer for women who are sick of taking the Pill daily.

Figures suggest around three million British women take the Pill. While in the US, it is estimated 11million rely on the method of contraception.  

Many women don't take the contraceptive pill at the right time every day, which then greatly diminishes its effectiveness.

As a result, long-acting contraceptives such as the implant more often get a nod of approval from

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