'Keto and carnivore diets will NOT protect your teeth!' Dentists warn against ...

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Dentists have urged those on a low-carb diet to keep brushing their teeth - because they may wrongly think they don't need to.

Dieters who cut back on carbs - such as carnivores and those following the A-list's favourite keto - often brag of having better oral health.

They claim their gum disease and teeth cavities have vanished by cutting out foods such as bread, pasta and rice.

Dentists have now warned dieters that they still need to brush their teeth - even if they are eating less decay-causing sugar.

Regardless of what you eat, without brushing, a film of slime will occur on the teeth which can cause gum disease and 'keto breath'.

The British Dental Association said: 'In theory, there may be a reduced risk of tooth decay but good oral health also requires a balanced nutritious diet.

'The advice, regardless of this diet or any other, is to brush teeth twice a day, with a fluoride toothpaste, including last thing at night.' 

It comes after a US poll revealed nearly a fifth of people took nutrition advice from social media, a quarter of which had tried the keto diet. 

People on carnivore or keto diets often claim their gum disease and teeth cavities have disappeared (pictured)

People on carnivore or keto diets often claim their gum disease and teeth cavities have disappeared (pictured)

New Yorker Travis Statham, who advocates a carnivorous diet on CarniWay, wrote on Twitter: 'If you look at any human on a meat diet and compare them to a grain eater - you'll see a massive difference. I barely brush anymore'

New Yorker Travis Statham, who advocates a carnivorous diet on CarniWay, wrote on Twitter: 'If you look at any human on a meat diet and compare them to a grain eater - you'll see a massive difference. I barely brush anymore'

People who cut back on carbs in favour of meat often brag of having better oral health since switching to keto or carnivore diets, such as this user

People who cut back on carbs in favour of meat often brag of having better oral health since switching to keto or carnivore diets, such as this user

WHAT IS THE KETO DIET?

The Ketogenic diet defines a low-carb, high-fat way of eating. 

Following this eating plan forces the body into a metabolic state, known as ketosis, which starves the body of carbohydrates but not calories.

Carbs are shunned in the keto diet as they cause the body to produce glucose, which is used as energy over fat.

Keto diets therefore lead to weight loss as they make the body burn fat as its primary energy source.

On the diet, followers can eat:

Meat Leafy greens and most vegetables  Full-fat dairy Nuts and seeds Avocadoes and berries Fats, such as coconut oil

People cannot eat:

Grains, including rice and wheat Sugar, like honey and maple syrup Most fruit White or sweet potatoes 

The keto diet allows high fat foods, such as nuts and seeds, fruit and vegetables. But only those that are low in carbohydrates.

Followers of the carnivore diet also skip carbs, instead sticking to just meat, fish, and other animal foods like eggs and certain dairy products.  

Carbohydrates are broken down into sugars in the mouth. They work with bacteria in the mouth to begin the decay process. 

But the BDA's scientific adviser Professor Damien Walmsley told MailOnline this does not mean dieters following either regime don't need to brush their teeth.

He said: 'Irrespective of what you eat, plaque is a sticky biofilm that develops on teeth as a result of the bacteria that naturally live in the mouth.

'It needs to be removed by regular tooth brushing, twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, or it will lead to gum disease.

'Devotees of this diet often experience foul smelling breath, the so-called "ketosis breath".'  

Such claims about low-carb diets being good for oral health can often be found on social media. 

New Yorker Travis Statham, who advocates a carnivorous diet on CarniWay, wrote on Twitter: 'If you look at any human on a meat diet and compare them to a grain eater - you'll see a massive difference. I barely brush anymore.'

While Chris Donohue, a health coach based in the US, said: 'Before carnivore, my teeth and gums were shot (gum disease, bleeding, pitting, excessive plaque, etc.) #Carnivore for the win!'

Some followers of low-carb diets say their beliefs are based on a book written in the 1939 - Nutrition and Physical Degeneration.

The book was written by Weston A Price, a Cleveland dentist and founder of London-based research institute National Dental Association. He died in 1948.  

Mr Price traveled across the world analysing the oral hygiene and mouths of 14 isolated groups, including

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