Girls are just as good at math as boys, finds brain imaging study

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more
Girls are JUST at good at math as boys and brain maturity does not vary by gender, new study finds, debunking the myth that has helped fuel the STEM gender gap The belief that boys are naturally better at math has long persisted in the US and around the world It's partly blamed for the gender gap in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields   In recent years, studies have begun to suggest that the differences in boys' and girls' performances in math is more complicated that pure ability  Researchers at Carnegie Mellon did functional MRI scans of the brains of boys and girls between three and eight as well as adults  While undergoing FMRIs, the participants were shown videos teaching basic counting and addition  There were no differences in the ways that boys and girls processed the math information  Only maturity - not gender - determined the differences between the kids' and adults' brain activity  

By Natalie Rahhal Deputy Health Editor For Dailymail.com

Published: 15:38 GMT, 8 November 2019 | Updated: 04:41 GMT, 9 November 2019

61 shares

497

View
comments

Girls are just as good at mat has boys, according to science published Friday morning. 

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University used MRI images to monitor the brain activity of children while they learned early mathematical concepts. 

The boys' and girls' brains worked and processed the information in the same way, the study authors report. 

'Science doesn't align with folk belief' said Dr Jessica Cantlon, who led the research. 

'We see that children's brains function similarly regardless of their gender so hopefully we can recalibrate expectations of what children can achieve in mathematics.'   

Despite historical stereotypes about girls' math abilities, a new study used brain imaging to show there's no difference between how their brains and boys' process counting and addition

Despite historical stereotypes about girls' math abilities, a new study used brain imaging to show there's no difference between how their brains and boys' process counting and addition

From very young ages, little girls - in the US and around most of the world - confront many negative stereotypes: that they're not as good at math, that they're not as strong, fast or physically capable, and more.  

Gender disparities continue through their lives, as seen in wage gaps, gaps in the positions and opportunities available to boys versus boys (differences that are now even more complicate as we discover a

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV DR MAX PEMBERTON reveals how eating alone can ruin your appetite for life - as ...
NEXT Liver cancer deaths have increased by around 50% in the last decade