Woman, 25, is left with a droopy face after surgery to remove a brain tumour ...

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Samantha Taylor, 25, has been left with facial paralysis after surgery to remove a brain tumour caused her to have a stroke

Samantha Taylor, 25, has been left with facial paralysis after surgery to remove a brain tumour caused her to have a stroke

A woman has been left with half of her face paralysed after surgery to remove a brain tumour caused her to have a stroke.

Samantha Taylor, 25, suffered from monthly dizzy spells in her teenage years which would sometimes wake her up in the middle of the night. 

An MRI scan revealed a small tumour in her brain at the age of 18. But doctors decided not to operate because the mass was not cancerous and her symptoms were minor.

Ms Taylor, from Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, had checkups every six months to monitor the tumour's development.

But when her symptoms remained subdued medics scaled back her appointments to just one per year in 2014. 

Just when she thought the coast was clear, her dizziness made a vicious return four years later, causing her to have blurry vision and terrifying head rushes.

The financial officer, who lives in London, underwent brain surgery in June to remove the tumour – which had now grown to over 2.2cm.

But doctors think that a possible stroke during surgery left her with facial paralysis on her right side - which left her struggling to eat or drink properly. She was also temporarily blinded following the procedure.  

The financial officer suffered from monthly dizzy spells in her teenage years which would sometimes wake her up in the middle of the night

The financial officer suffered from monthly dizzy spells in her teenage years which would sometimes wake her up in the middle of the night

An MRI revealed a small tumour in her brain at the age of 18, but doctors decided not to operate because the mass was not cancerous and her symptoms were minor

An MRI revealed a small tumour in her brain at the age of 18, but doctors decided not to operate because the mass was not cancerous and her symptoms were minor

But her dizziness made a vicious return in 2018 and she underwent brain surgery in June to remove the tumour

Medics removed the tumour by slicing an opening in the back of her skull

But her dizziness made a vicious return in 2018 and she underwent brain surgery in June to remove the tumour – which had now grown to over 2.2cm. Pictured in a wheelchair after the op (left) and with her scar (right)

Brain surgery patients are warned before surgery there is a small risk - roughly 5 per cent - of a stroke occurring. 

Facial paralysis occurs during a stroke when nerves that control the muscles in the face are damaged in the brain. 

Ms Taylor said: 'I was really apprehensive about the risks of surgery and whether I would be the same afterwards.

'But I really liked my surgeon, and had full confidence in him which made a huge difference. 

'I had surgery in June 2019, where they think I may have suffered a cerebellum stroke as part of my brain didn't get any blood supply during surgery, and that does explain why my right side is much weaker.

'After my surgery I couldn't see at all for a few days. This is much better now as it only happens when I look left and right and I have been given glasses with a prism to help with the double vision as I currently see two of everything.

'Due to my facial paralysis, I couldn't eat properly, use a straw or blow out a candle until recently.  The more movement I get in my cheek, the easier it is to do these things.'

Doctors think that a possible stroke during surgery left her with droopiness on her right side

Doctors think that a possible stroke during surgery left her with droopiness on her right side

Ms Taylor was was also temporarily blinded following the procedure (getting a massage to ease her dizziness and nausea)

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