Concussion sufferers may have trouble reading

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more
Concussion sufferers may have trouble reading due to trauma that disrupts communication between the brain's two halves, study finds Concussion sufferers can suffer damage to their corpus callosum, a mesh of nerve fibers that connect the brain's right and left sides Scientists at New York University studied 36 patients with concussion and 27 without They showed what concussion-inflicted corpus callosum damage looks like on an MRI They also showed that sufferers struggle with comprehending information quickly

By Mia De Graaf Health Editor For Dailymail.com

Published: 10:00 GMT, 3 December 2019 | Updated: 10:00 GMT, 3 December 2019

View
comments

Athletes who suffer multiple concussions may have trouble reading because the impact can disrupt communication between the brain's two halves, according to a new study. 

Scientists have long known that mild brain injuries inflict damage on a wire of nerve fibers called the corpus callosum, which carries information between the left- and right-hand sides of the brain.

But until now it was unclear how it looks, and what it meant for sufferers.

Now, in a study of 36 patients with recent concussion and 27 without, neuroscientists at New York University have shown what concussion-inflicted corpus callosum damage looks like on an MRI, and that sufferers struggle with comprehending information quickly. 

Neuroscientists at New York University have shown what concussion-inflicted corpus callosum damage looks like on an MRI (pictured)

Neuroscientists at New York University have shown what concussion-inflicted corpus callosum damage looks like on an MRI (pictured)

Scientists have long known that mild brain injuries inflict damage on a wire of nerve fibers called the corpus callosum, which carries information between the left- and right-hand sides of the brain (stock)

Scientists have long known that mild brain injuries inflict damage on a wire of nerve fibers called the corpus callosum, which carries information between the left- and right-hand sides of the brain (stock)

Experts say the findings could help sports doctors identify a new tell-tale sign of serious damage after players suffer concussions, and intervene earlier with specific exercise programs or even surgery. 

The research, presented today at the annual meeting of the

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Scientists have come up with a 'liquid health check' which could predict a ...
NEXT ASK DR ELLIE: Will dieting make my gallstones even worse?