Most homeless people have suffered a traumatic brain injury, study finds

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Most homeless people have suffered a traumatic brain injury, study finds 53% percent of homeless people have suffered traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), a rate 2.3 to four times that of the general population  25% suffered head trauma described as moderate to severe, which is a rate 10 times greater that of population as whole Homeless people with TBIs were at higher risk for thoughts of suicide, poor memory and involvement in the criminal justice system Researchers could not determine if TBIs increased the risk of homelessness or vice versa

By Mary Kekatos Health Reporter For Dailymail.com

Published: 21:39 GMT, 4 December 2019 | Updated: 21:40 GMT, 4 December 2019

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The majority of homeless people have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI), a new study says.

Researchers found that one in two people without a roof over their heads - 53 percent - have experienced head trauma.

What's more, 25 percent had suffered a moderate or severe injury, described as  being unconscious for at least 30 minutes or have a lingering disability. 

The team, from the University of British Columbia in Canada, is calling for more awareness of TBIs among homeless people and that healthcare workers should check for a history of TBIs when treating the homeless, which may improve their care.

A new study from the University of British Columbia has found that the prevalence of all TBIs among homeless people was between 2.5 and four higher than the general population. Pictured: A homeless man sits along a sidewalk in New York City, December 2017

A new study from the University of British Columbia has found that the prevalence of all TBIs among homeless people was between 2.5 and four higher than the general population. Pictured: A homeless man sits along a sidewalk in New York City, December 2017

There are currently more than 553,700 people in the US experiencing homelessness on any given night. 

Those who sleep on their streets can suffer from huge declines in physical and mental health due to their homeless status, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states. 

Brain injuries can range from mild concussions to severe blows to the head a

While the majority of people recover from a mild brain trauma,

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