Rugby player infected by parasites after falling on dog poo on the pitch

An amateur rugby player spent Christmas in hospital after a wound that had been infected by dog faeces 12 years ago suddenly flared up.

Dan Colbridge, 33, was kept in hospital for nine days after his leg broke out in sore blisters and left him struggling to walk.

The father-of-two was first affected by cellulitis in 2007 after attending a training session with a small cut on his leg.

Without realising, he landed in the dog mess and harmful parasites entered his open wound. A few days later he was struck down with excruciating pain.

He was diagnosed with cellulitis caused by toxocariasis, a rare roundworm infection that entered his bloodstream. It can be spread through coming into contact with animal faeces.

Mr Colbridge, from Bridgend in Wales, was prescribed antibiotics and the infection eventually cleared up.

Dan Colbridge, 33, was kept in hospital for nine days over Christmas after a wound that had been infected by dog poo 12 years ago suddenly flared up. His children visited him during his hospital stint

Dan Colbridge, 33, was kept in hospital for nine days over Christmas after a wound that had been infected by dog poo 12 years ago suddenly flared up. His children visited him during his hospital stint

The father-of-two was first affected by the injury in 2007 after attending a training session with a small cut on his leg. Without realising, he landed in the dog mess and harmful parasites entered his open wound

The father-of-two was first affected by the injury in 2007 after attending a training session with a small cut on his leg. Without realising, he landed in the dog mess and harmful parasites entered his open wound

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT. The father-of-two's leg broke out in sore red blisters

He was diagnosed with cellulitis in December

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT. The father-of-two's leg broke out in sore red blisters after contracting cellulitis in December. He has been prone to infections since the injury in 2007

But his immune system is thought to have been left permanently damaged, making him prone to bacterial infections.

Twelve years after beating toxocariasis, Mr Colbridge experienced persistent pain in the same part of his leg.

He was admitted to Princess of Wales Hospital in Bridgend where he spent nine days waiting for his infection to go down. 

Doctors told him that he once again had cellulitis, which caused the skin on his leg to swell and become painful to touch.

Cellulitis occurs when bacteria that live on the surface of the skin, most commonly streptococcus and staphylococcus, enter through a crack or break.

Anyone who has had the bacterial infection before has up to a 20 per cent chance of it returning.

TOXOCARIASIS: THE PARASITE THAT CAN DESTROY VISION 

Toxocariasis is a rare infection caused by roundworm parasites (Toxocara).

It is spread from animals to humans via their infected faeces.

Ocular larva migrans is the least common but potentially most serious type of toxocariasis.

The condition can develop if the roundworm parasites move into the eyes.

The main symptoms of ocular larva migrans are blurred or cloudy vision and irritation of the eyes. 

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Vapers have been complaining about health problems online for years, study finds
NEXT Man who lost half his leg says doctors have REFUSED to save his stump