Man who lost half his leg says doctors have REFUSED to save his stump

An amputee who lost half of his leg due to a blood clot has told how doctors have refused to save his dying stump.

Ben Lovell, from Halifax in Yorkshire, is desperate to keep the remaining part of his right limb. 

The 41-year-old had his shin bone amputated two years ago, after his foot turned white from a lack of circulation.

Doctors discovered he had a blood clot in his leg, revealing it was responsible for cramps in his calf that he had suffered for months.

Medics are reportedly shocked that his leftover stump hasn't already died because the main artery to his thigh is now completely blocked by another clot.

But he says NHS medics are reluctant to operate on his leg to unblock the clot and save his stump.

Mr Lovell fears having the remaining part of his leg cut off when it dies will leave him unable to get a prosthetic and render him wheelchair-bound. 

The father-of-two admits that he is in pain every time he takes a step, but can put up with the daily agony because 'at least I can still walk'.

Mr Lovell has been left to try and rehabilitate his stump by himself, using exercise to push blood through to his dying upper leg.   

Ben Lovell, 41, claims doctors have refused to save his stump that is lacking a blood supply. He lost his leg in 2017 due to a blood clot and now wears a prosthetic leg (pictured)

Ben Lovell, 41, claims doctors have refused to save his stump that is lacking a blood supply. He lost his leg in 2017 due to a blood clot and now wears a prosthetic leg (pictured)

Mr Lovell claims medics are shocked his stump hasn't already died because the main artery to the thigh is blocked. The stump is white (pictured) from the lack of blood flow

Mr Lovell claims medics are shocked his stump hasn't already died because the main artery to the thigh is blocked. The stump is white (pictured) from the lack of blood flow

Mr Lovell, from Halifax, struggled to adapt to life as an amputee and said the recent news was a 'kick in the teeth'. He is pictured after half his leg was removed in November 2017

Mr Lovell, from Halifax, struggled to adapt to life as an amputee and said the recent news was a 'kick in the teeth'. He is pictured after half his leg was removed in November 2017

When asked about why he is annoyed by the NHS decision to not operate, he said: 'I want to save my leg.

'The higher up you amputate it, the harder it is to walk. If goes too high, I won’t get to wear a prosthetic.'

Mr Lovell, a former road worker, added: 'I may be still in pain every time I take a step, but at least I can still walk.

'My femoral artery (the main artery in both legs)... is completely blocked all the way from my stomach all the way down to my leg.

'The only thing keeping my [amputated] leg alive at the moment are the little blood vessels and they [doctors] don't know how long that's going to last for. 

'I've spoken to doctors, specialists and professors and they all say my leg, as it's been blocked for twelve months now, should be dead. 

'It should be of no use to me whatsoever, but I can still do what I can do because I'm pushing that blood into it.'

Mr Lovell's life-changing ordeal began in February 2017, when he started feeling cramps in his right calf. 

He went to see his GP who put the cramps down to sciatica, a pain caused by the compression of the sciatic nerve, which runs from your hips to your feet.

Five months went by with no improvement. Mr Lovell said he was eventually rushed to Bradford Hospital after his foot turned white.

A typical symptom of a blood clot is a red, swollen leg. It can also turn the skin a blue colour.

Tests at the hospital revealed that there was no blood circulating to Mr Lovell's foot due to a blood clot in his leg.

In September, he was given a seven-hour bypass operation in an attempt to save his leg. 

An arterial bypass creates a new route for blood to get into the leg, typically by using a piece of another blood vessel.

Mr Lovell claims doctors have left him to get on with his life by rehabilitating his stump himself. He uses exercise to help push blood into the area and keep his stump alive

Mr Lovell claims doctors have left him to get on with his life by rehabilitating his stump himself. He uses exercise to help push blood into the area and keep his stump alive

The father-of-two was fit and healthy before he suddenly started suffering cramps in his calf in February 2017. He was rushed to hospital in the July when his foot turned white (pictured)

The father-of-two was fit and healthy before he suddenly started suffering cramps in his calf in February 2017. He was rushed to hospital in the July when his foot turned white (pictured)

A seven-hour bypass surgery to save Mr Lovell's leg failed. He was told it would need to be amputated (pictured afterwards)

A seven-hour bypass surgery to save Mr Lovell's leg failed. He was told it would need to be amputated (pictured afterwards)

But the procedure was unsuccessful, and Mr Lovell was told to have the best chance at living a normal life he would need to have his leg amputated. 

On November 29, Mr Lovell underwent surgery to remove his leg. Back at home after his surgery, he struggled to adapt to life as an amputee.

He said: 'Having to come home and adapt now to living life with one leg was just hard, just very hard.

'I went through probably a good twelve months of being low. I turned to drugs, alcohol, suicidal thoughts.' 

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Mr Lovell said daily tasks

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