Black people 'are FOUR TIMES more likely to die from coronavirus than white ...

Black people are four times more likely to die from coronavirus than white people, according to figures released today.

Government statisticians analysed the number of all COVID-19-related fatalities in England and Wales between March 2 and April 10.

Data showed the risk of dying from the coronavirus was 'significantly' higher among some ethnic groups compared to white people despite age.

After accounting for health conditions and differences in factors such as income, the risk for black people drops to 1.9 times more likely.

The reasons behind the findings remain largely 'unexplained', said the Office for National Statistics, who collected the data. 

It comes amid an urgent Number 10 investigation into the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on black and minority ethnic Britons.  

A series of worrying studies have shown the risk of dying from coronavirus for BAME communities is several times higher. 

It has prompted calls for black and minority ethnic NHS workers to be removed from the frontline over concerns they are more vulnerable to coronavirus. 

Government statisticians analysed the number of all COVID-19-related fatalities in England and Wales between March 2 and April 10. Data showed the risk of dying from the coronavirus was 'significantly' higher among some ethnic groups compared to white people

Government statisticians analysed the number of all COVID-19-related fatalities in England and Wales between March 2 and April 10. Data showed the risk of dying from the coronavirus was 'significantly' higher among some ethnic groups compared to white people

The ONS data compared the deaths they had recorded in all settings with ones confirmed by NHS England hospitals that went up to April 21

The ONS data compared the deaths they had recorded in all settings with ones confirmed by NHS England hospitals that went up to April 21

Dr Craig Wakeham (pictured), a GP from Dorset, is believed to the only doctor who has died and is not from the Black, Asian and ethnic minority community

Dr Craig Wakeham (pictured), a GP from Dorset, is believed to the only doctor who has died and is not from the Black, Asian and ethnic minority community

The ONS data, released today, analysed 12,805 confirmed and suspected COVID-19 deaths that occurred in all settings in England and Wales between March 2 and April 10.

As ethnicity is not recorded on death certificates, the ONS linked these to the 2011 Census which includes self-reported ethnicity. 

Raw data showed white people made up 83.8 per cent of the fatalities, despite 87 per cent of people in the UK being white.

Black people made up the largest minority ethnic group of COVID-19 victims, accounting for six per cent.  

Black males are 4.2 times more likely to die from a COVID-19-related death and black females are 4.3 times more likely than white ethnicity males and females.

WHY ARE SO MANY CORONAVIRUS VICTIMS FROM BAME BACKGROUNDS? 

A series of worrying studies have shown the risk of dying from coronavirus for BAME communities is several times higher. 

The findings prompted an urgent Number 10 investigation into the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on black and minority ethnic Britons.

Experts say there is unlikely to be one sole reason as to why ethnic minorities are more likely to become severely ill or die from the virus.

They could also be more at risk because of their professions, according to Shaomeng Jia, an economics professor at Alabama State University’s College of Business Administration.

Those working in retail, in supermarkets and in construction - who cannot work from home - were still mingling and risking infection even when the outbreak peaked, she said.

Meanwhile, health care jobs, including NHS workers and care home staff are exposed to bigger loads of the virus more often because they come into face-to-face contact with gravely ill patients.

Having a high viral load - the number of particles of the virus someone is first infected with - gives the bug a 'jump start', scientists say.

Members of ethnic minority communities are twice as likely to be affected by poverty, and are often hit the hardest by chronic diseases.

Those living in poverty smoke and drink alcohol more and are more likely to be obese - all of which increase the likelihood of chronic health conditions.

Patients with pre-existing health troubles struggle to fight off COVID-19 before it causes deadly complications such as pneumonia.

Impoverished people are also more likely to use public transport more often and live in crowded houses - driving up their chance of catching and spreading the virus. 

But after taking account of socio-demographic characteristics and measures of self-reported health and disability, the risk of a COVID-19-related death for males and females of black ethnicity reduces to 1.9 times more likely than those of white ethnicity. 

People of Bangladeshi and Pakistani, Indian, and mixed ethnicities also have a  significantly raised risk of death, ONS data shows.

Males in the Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic group are 1.8 times more likely to have a COVID-19-related death than white males when taking age and other factors into account.

For females, the figure is 1.6 times more likely. 

The ONS found increased mortality rates due to COVID-19 for all ethnic minority groups, except for in Chinese women. 

The ONS said a 'substantial part' of the difference in COVID-19 mortality between ethnic groups is explained by differences in how these communities live, such as areas with socio-economic deprivation.

It continued: 'Geographic and socio-economic factors were accounting for over half of the difference in risk between males and females of black and white ethnicity. 

'However, these factors do not explain all of the difference, suggesting that other causes are still to be identified.'

Keith Neal, emeritus professor of the epidemiology of infectious diseases, University of Nottingham, said it was important to acknowledge that COVID-19 death risk is nearly double in the Black group as is the Pakistani/Bangladeshi group.

Mounting data from NHS intensive care units shows BAME populations face a greater risk of suffering complications than white Britons, including a report from the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS) think-tank earlier this month. 

It said that Black and Asian Britons are two-and-a-half times more likely to die from coronavirus than white people after comparing the number of hospital deaths in the NHS during the COVID-19 crisis against ethnicity. 

It did not look at hospital admissions, meaning it could not tell if BAME groups were more at risk of catching the virus. The report only suggested their risk of death was greater.  

An Imperial College study found that 40 per cent of Covid-19 patients in three London hospitals were from ethnic minorities - when in the UK 19.5 per cent of the population is from those groups. 

Similarly data from the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre has suggested 34.5 per cent of critically ill Covid-19 patients have BAME backgrounds.

This is despite just 10.8 per cent of the population being black or Asian, according to the 2011 census.

A spate of data analysis has prompted the government to launch an inquiry. On 16 April the UK Public Health England announced a formal review.

It will analyse the impact of different factors including ethnicity, gender and age on coronavirus outcomes and is expected to be published at the end of May, according to Equalities Minister Kemi Badenoch.

She told MPs yesterday that the government are 'very concerned' by reports of a 'disproportionate' impact of the disease on BAME communities. 

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said: 'Any death from this virus is a tragedy and we are working incredibly hard to protect the nation’s public health.

'We’re aware that this virus has sadly appeared to have a disproportionate effect on people from BAME backgrounds. It is critical we find out which groups are most at risk so we can take the right steps to protect them and minimise their risk.'  

After taking account of socio-demographic characteristics and measures of self-reported health and disability, the risk of a COVID-19-related death for males and females of black ethnicity reduces to 1.9 times more likely than those of white ethnicity

After taking account of socio-demographic characteristics and measures of self-reported health and disability, the risk of a COVID-19-related death for males and females of black ethnicity reduces to 1.9 times more likely than those of white ethnicity

Far higher numbers of people from black and Asian backgrounds have died from COVID-19 per 100,000 people than white Britons, despite making up much less of the overall population. 'Other whites' include Gypsy and Irish Travellers, and 'other ethnic group' includes Arabs

Far higher numbers of people from black and Asian backgrounds have died from COVID-19 per 100,000 people than white Britons, despite making up much less of the overall population. 'Other whites' include Gypsy and Irish Travellers, and 'other ethnic group' includes Arabs

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