Americans are 12-times more likely to die in hospitals of covid than any other ...

For many people who died of coronavirus, the suffering of their final days was accompanied by the pain of dying alone and isolated from their families, a new study reveals. 

The odds that a US COVID-19 victim who died between February and May this year would do so in hospital were 11.5-times higher than the odds of dying in a hospital of any cause during the same period in 2018, according to Northwestern University research. 

During that time period in 2020, nearly 70 percent of people who succumbed to COVID-19 died in hospitals or other medical facilities. Another 23 percent died in nursing homes. 

And the researchers believe many of these victims were likely nursing home patients transferred to hospitals, given the high death toll of coronavirus among elderly Americans.  

Long term care facilities and hospitals alike had to impose restrictions on visitors to reduce the spread of coronavirus, which likely meant loved ones could not be at the sides of these dying patients in their final days and hours. 

Now, nursing homes are warning of another spike in infections as coronavirus spreads in new hotspots - and it could mean another wave of excruciatingly lonely deaths and losses for thousands of families. 

'A loved one dying alone takes a huge mental toll on families,' said lead study author Dr Sadiya Khan.

'it impairs the family’s ability to grieve and cope with the loss [and], for patients, we’ve all thought about how terrible it would be to have to die alone. This is the horror happening to thousands of people in medical facilities where no family member or loved one is able to be present with them during their final moments on earth.' 

Between February and March, 2020, 70% of Americans who died of COVID-19 spent their final days in hospitals (red, far left), likely alone, compared to just 35% percent of people who died of any cause in 2018 (blue), new Northwestern University research reveals

Between February and March, 2020, 70% of Americans who died of COVID-19 spent their final days in hospitals (red, far left), likely alone, compared to just 35% percent of people who died of any cause in 2018 (blue), new Northwestern University research reveals  

Americans ar 12 times more likely to die in hospitals of COVID-19 this year than they were of any cause in 2018, a new study reveals - and it means many spend their final days alone (file)

Americans ar 12 times more likely to die in hospitals of COVID-19 this year than they were of any cause in 2018, a new study reveals - and it means many spend their final days alone (file)

Every year, Americans die alone in hospitals or nursing homes, rather than in the comfort of home, surrounded by family and friends as most people hope. 

These deaths in isolation are still common, but much less so, in a typical year. 

According to the Northwestern University researchers' analysis of Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) data, about 36 percent of deaths by any cause in the same time period of 2018 (the most recent year for which the agency has complete data) occurred in medical facilities. 

Another 19 percent of Americans died in nursing homes and about eight percent died in hospice facilities that year. 

Nearly a third (31 percent) of all people who died that year in the US did so at home, where most people say they'd like to be when they reach the end of their lives. 

But 2020 has not been a typical year. 

Since February 1, there have been as many as 212,979 'excess deaths' - that is, fatality counts

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