Face shields and masks with valves do NOT stop the coronavirus from spreading ...

Face shields and masks with valves do not prevent the coronavirus from spreading into the air and being breathed in by others, a new simulation suggests. 

Researchers found that face coverings with exhalations valves let unfiltered particles escape as well as from the gap at the bridge of the nose.

Additionally, while visors prevents the initial forward spread of droplets, the gap at the bottom actual allows the infectious aerosols to spread behind the person. 

The team, from Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science, says the findings prove not all face coverings are created equally and can help Americans choose on what to and not to wear when going out in public.

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Researchers performed experiments in which a mannequin coughed and sneezed while wearing a face shield and a mask with a valve

Researchers performed experiments in which a mannequin coughed and sneezed while wearing a face shield and a mask with a valve

Face shields blocked the initial forward motion of droplets, but allowed them to spread behind the person

Masks with valves let unfiltered particles escape through the valve and via the gap at the bridge of the nose

Face shields blocked the initial forward motion of droplets, but allowed them to spread behind the person (left and right). Meanwhile, masks with valves let unfiltered particles escape through the valve and via the gap at the bridge of the nose

For the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids, the team set up laboratory experiments to test the effectiveness of face shields and masks with valves at stopping the spread of aerosol-sized droplets.

By illuminating the droplets, they could map out the paths of particles and see how well the face coverings performed.

A mannequin was set up to expel sneeze and cough droplets, and a mixture of distilled water and glycerin was used to generate the synthetic fog of a cough-jet.

In the first experiment, a mannequin 'sneezed' while wearing a face shield, and the droplets were tracked using a horizontal laser sheet and a vertical laser sheet.

Face shields blocked the initial forward motion of droplets from the cough-jet, but other particles spread around the front of the shield with ease.

Not only this, but the visor also allowed particles to spread in the reverse direction and

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