Teenagers who are unpopular at school face a greater risk of heart attacks

Teenagers who are unpopular at school face a greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke in later life, study finds The scientists from Stockholm University tracked 14,000 people born in 1953 At the age of 13 each teenager's popularity was gauged through questionnaires   The participants were then tracked until 2016, allowing doctors to find trends

By Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent For The Daily Mail

Published: 22:30 BST, 15 September 2020 | Updated: 23:33 BST, 15 September 2020

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Teens who are unpopular at school are at risk of a heart attack or stroke in later life, researchers have found.

Social relationships and emotional trauma in adolescence have a lasting impact on health, the study suggests.

A team of researchers from Stockholm University found children who were marginalised at the age of 13 were 33 per cent more likely to suffer cardiovascular disease in adulthood.

Social relationships and emotional trauma in adolescence have a lasting impact on health, the study suggests

Social relationships and emotional trauma in adolescence have a lasting impact on health, the study suggests

WHAT IS A HEART ATTACK?

Figures suggest there are 200,000 hospital visits because of heart attacks in the UK each year, while there are around 800,000 annually in the US.

A heart attack, known medically as a myocardial infarction, occurs when the supply of blood to the heart is suddenly blocked. 

Symptoms include chest pain, shortness of breath, and feeling weak and anxious.

Heart attacks are commonly caused by coronary heart disease, which can be brought on by smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Treatment is usually medication to dissolve blots clots or surgery to remove the blockage.

Reduce your risk by not smoking, exercising regularly and drinking in moderation.

Heart attacks are different to a cardiac arrest, which occurs when the heart suddenly stops pumping blood around the body, usually due to a problem with electrical signals

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