Heart rate measuring can help spot depression as it beats faster, study finds

Measuring a person's heart rate can help spot depression as it beats faster and is less likely to drop at night, study finds Depressed people's hearts beat an extra 10-15 times per minute on average during daytime, study at Goethe University found Their hearts may have to work harder because their chronic stress or anxiety means they're constantly in low-level state of 'fight or flight' Inflammation caused by poor mental health may also reduce activity of vagus nerve, which helps to regulate heart rate

By Victoria Allen for the Daily Mail

Published: 23:08 BST, 11 September 2020 | Updated: 23:11 BST, 11 September 2020

58 shares

86

View
comments

Measuring a person's heart rate could be a way of spotting if they are suffering from depression.

Depressed people's hearts beat an extra ten to 15 times per minute on average during the daytime, a study has found.

Their heart rates fell at night – which is normal as we recover from the stresses and strains of the day – but less so than people who were not depressed.

Scientists discovered this after tracking the heart rates of 16 people with depression and 16 who were not depressed over four days and three nights.

They were able to predict who had depression, based on their heart rate alone, in up to 90 per cent of cases.

The new, highly accurate operation is being used to treat atrial fibrillation, in which heart nerves misfire, leading to a rapid, irregular pulse (file photo)

Measuring a person's heart rate could be a way of spotting if they are suffering from depression. Depressed people's hearts beat an extra ten to 15 times per minute on average during the daytime, a study has found. (File image)

Experts believe that depressed people's hearts may have to work harder because their chronic stress or anxiety means that they are constantly in a low-level state of 'fight or flight'.

Inflammation in the body caused by poor mental health may also reduce activity of the vagus nerve, which helps to regulate heart rate. 

The findings mean people could detect early signs of poor mental

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Why children ARE more protected from severe COVID-19 than adults
NEXT NHS enrolls 5,000 patients in mass trial of its soups and shakes diet to ...