Feeding C-section babies their mothers' POOP helps them develop healthy gut ...

Feeding C-section babies their mothers' POOP helps them develop healthy gut bacteria transferred to other infants from their mothers during childbirth Fecal transplant occur when a stool sample from a healthy donor is transferred to the patient so the balance of bacteria is restored Babies born via C-section have different gut bacteria makeup than babies born vaginally because they are not exposed to bacteria from the mother's vagina  Researchers diluted a small amount of feces from the mothers into breast milk and fed them to the infants shortly after birth After three months, their microbiotas resembled that of babies born vaginally and not those born via C-section who didn't receive the transplant

By Mary Kekatos Senior Health Reporter For Dailymail.com

Published: 16:00 BST, 1 October 2020 | Updated: 16:00 BST, 1 October 2020

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Feeding babies delivered via cesarean section (C-section) their mother's poop may help them develop healthy microbiota, a new small study suggests.

Infants born this way have an increased risk of allergies and asthma because they are not exposed to the bacteria from the mother's vagina and perineum during birth.

In a drastic approach, researchers diluted a small amount of the mother's feces into breast milk and fed it to the newborn shortly after delivery. 

The team, from the Pediatric Research Center at the University of Helsinki, found the process was safe and that, within three months, the babies had gut bacteria that resembled those of babies born vaginally am not of those born via C-section who did not receive a transplant.

A new study from the University of Helsinki found that C-section babies who had a small amount of their mothers' feces fed to them at birth had gut bacteria similar to infants born vaginally (file image)

A new study from the University of Helsinki found that C-section babies who had a small amount of their mothers' feces fed to them at birth had gut bacteria similar to infants born vaginally (file image)

'From a clinical point of view, this transfer of microbial material is happening during a vaginal delivery,' said co-senior author Sture Andersson, a professor at the University of Helsinki in Finland.

'This is a gift the mother gives to her baby.' 

Fecal transplantation - which has become more popular in

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