FDA approves first treatment for Ebola

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials approved the first treatment for Ebola on Wednesday. 

Regulators greenlit a trio of antibody drugs developed by Regeneron to treat the hemorrhagic fever virus that has killed tens of thousands of people in West Africa, and is up to 90 percent fatal. 

Regeneron is making another antibody to treat the newest viral threat to humanity, COVID-19, but the two treatments are entirely unrelated. 

Ebola patients treated with Regeneron's antibody 'cocktail' in trials were one third less likely to die than were people who did not get the drug.  

Although a vaccine against Ebola was approved in December of last year and was declared officially 'over' in June, has been little doctors could do to improve survival odds for someone who does catch the devastating virus. 

'It's still pretty terrifying' said former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) associate commissioner Peter Pitts of Ebola. 

'If there is an approved treatment for it, that's as close to a miracle as you get.' 

He reiterated that the approval for a Regeneron antibody cocktail for treating Ebola was entirely coincidental and unrelated to COVID-19 treatments. 

Afterall, 'Ebola is a death sentence, COVID-19 is not,' he added. 

FDA regulators on Wednesday approved Inmazeb, an antibody 'cocktail' and the first drug with officials' seal of approval for treating Ebola. It cuts death rates from the disease by about 30%

FDA regulators on Wednesday approved Inmazeb, an antibody 'cocktail' and the first drug with officials' seal of approval for treating Ebola. It cuts death rates from the disease by about 30% 

West Africa has been hit by a series of episodes of Ebola that have reached epidemic levels, and even bordered on pandemic levels. 

The 2014-2016 outbreak spread to 28,616 people and killed 11,310 people across the neighboring nations of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.  

Ebola crept outside of those nations' borders too, with 36 cases and 15 deaths across the rest of the world, including 11 cases and one death in the US in 2014. 

Cases of the viral disease spiked again in 2018-2019. Nearly 3,300 people were infected, primarily in the Kivu region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Two-thirds of people who contracted the virus died. 

Ebola's source is unclear coronavirus, it may well have made the jump to humans from bats. 

It spreads via blood following contact with blood, tissue and bodily fluids. 

That makes it particularly dangerous because a

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