Fewer than half of NYC residents have had a first Covid vaccine dose

The number of shots being administered a day has slowed to a crawl, even in parts of the country with low rates of vaccine hesitancy. 

In New York City, more than 115,000 were given in a single day on April 8. Yesterday, that figure was four-fold lower. Just 28,193 shots were recorded by the city and even if that reflects a lag in data, it's a dramatic drop. 

The city is so flush in shots, it now offers walk-up vaccines for anyone at all city-run sites (so long as supply lasts), but instead of lines snaking around city blocks, clinics saw a steady and likely slowing trickle of visitors looking for shots. 

So who is missing from the vaccination drive? Neither NYC nor the U.S. as a whole has vaccinated nearly enough people for only the hesitant to be left, and there is no shortage of vaccine supply or appointments.  

Caught in the current limbo are people for whom getting vaccines presents a complicated logistical challenge: Those who work multiple jobs or shift work that they can't afford to miss, who don't have an easy way to get to a vaccination site or are simply unaware that how to get a shot. 

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During the April 17-25 walk-in clinic pilot program for people 50 and older, for example, only three clinics were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The rest closed by 8pm at the latest. For people working many essential jobs, that's well before they clock off, although many clinics were open on weekends as well. 

Things have gotten easier, A vaccination advocate told DailyMail.com, but now people are also less motivated to get shots, as cases and deaths decline and the situation appears less dire. To solve the issue of getting to a vaccination clinic with little free time, advocates would like to see the city offer vans to bring people to and from clinics.  

Shots are declining across the country. Just 1.2 million COVID-19 shots were given to Americans on Monday - the fewest vaccinations since February 23, Bloomberg data tracking reveals. 

Even for a typically slow Monday, that was an abysmal vaccination rate, considering that for weeks the U.S. was giving an average of more than three million shots a day. 

Now, the seven-day rolling average of daily vaccinations has plummeted to 2.3 million, down nearly a third compared to the rate of 3.4 million a day seen just three weeks ago. 

Nearly half of the U.S. population - 44 percent - has now had at least one dose of Covid vaccines and nearly 32 percent of Americans are fully vaccinated.  

Despite the fact that fewer than half of NYC residents have had at least a first dose of Covid vaccine,28,000 shots were given yesterday, down four fold from the April 8 peak of more than 115,000 in a day

Despite the fact that fewer than half of NYC residents have had at least a first dose of Covid vaccine,28,000 shots were given yesterday, down four fold from the April 8 peak of more than 115,000 in a day 

Nationwide, the number of daily shots fell wo a low since February with just 1.2 million shots given - down from more than three million a day given just three weeks ago

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Nationwide, the number of daily shots fell wo a low since February with just 1.2 million shots given - down from more than three million a day given just three weeks ago 

Put simply: just because a pharmacy within a several mile radius of someone's home has plenty of vaccine doses doesn't mean that those doses are accessible to the people who need them.  

And then there's the paradox presented by improving Covid numbers. As vaccinations creep up, things are looking less dire in the U.S., with fewer than 50,000 new infections identified a day - a 28 percent drop in two weeks - and average daily deaths hovering just under 700, compared to nearly 840 a month prior. 

That's great news, but it may be disincentivizing some people from getting vaccinated as they see that the nation is headed in the right direction without them getting vaccinated. 

'There is no rushed feeling of "I have to get it right now," because vaccines are available everywhere,' Lorraine Braithwaite-Harte, Health Chair of the NAACP's New York State Conference told DailyMail.com. 

And coupled with a reduced sense of urgency, getting a shot is still not convenient for a broad swath of people in New York and the U.S. 

'Many people think, "I have to get to work, I can't fit vaccination in with the hours I have to see the hours

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