Remdesivir does NOT improve COVID-19 mortality rates, study finds

Remdesivir does NOT improve COVID-19 mortality rates, study finds
Remdesivir does NOT improve COVID-19 mortality rates, study finds
Trump-backed Remdesivir does NOT improve COVID-19 mortality rates and patients receiving the treatment spend MORE time in hospital, study finds Remdesivir did not make a significant impact in reducing mortality rates among patients that went to hospital, a new study find Patients who received the drug also, on average, spent twice as long in the hospital as others Researchers are unsure as to why people treated with the drug took up valuable room in emergency units for longer time Remdesivir was the first drug made available to hospital to combat COVID, first receiving emergency authorization in May 2020 

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Remdesivir, the first drug to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for treatment of COVID-19 patients may not improve mortality rates, a new study finds.

A research team led by the University of Iowa used data from the Veterans Health Administration to observe length of hospital stays and treatment outcomes among COVID-19 patients who were admitted to the hospital. 

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Results showed that there were no difference in mortality rates between those treated with remdesivir and those receiving standard care.

Patients who are treated with the drug have longer hospital stays as well. 

Their findings show that the drug that once was the only one available for the condition may not be very effective at all.

There was little difference found in mortality rates between COVID-19 patients who received remdesivir and patients in a control group, a new study finds

There was little difference found in mortality rates between COVID-19 patients who received remdesivir and patients in a control group, a new study finds

The drug first received emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May and received full approval in October 2020.

In the time since, three monoclonal antibody drugs have also been approved for emergency use treating the virus. 

However, questions have since circulated about whether or not the antibody treatment is actually effective. 

For the study,

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