Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Mother-of-one, 38, has fist-sized area of skin removed from her buttocks after ... trends now

Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Mother-of-one, 38, has fist-sized area of skin removed from her buttocks after ... trends now
Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Mother-of-one, 38, has fist-sized area of skin removed from her buttocks after ... trends now

Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Mother-of-one, 38, has fist-sized area of skin removed from her buttocks after ... trends now

A mother-of-one has had a fist-sized area of skin removed from her buttocks after doctors diagnosed skin cancer in one of her moles.

Jordan Lindley, 38, from Dallas, Texas, told DailyMail.com she had always had a mole slightly larger than a pencil eraser on her left buttocks.

But when the nurse went for a skin check for the first time in years, doctors raised concerns over the mole, saying it was 'very dark' and 'quite sizeable'.

Tests revealed it was stage one melanoma, the most dangerous type of skin cancer because it could spread to other areas of the body. Figures suggest when this happens only a third of patients live beyond five years.

Three weeks later she was taken for an operation where doctors sliced off the cancerous mole as well as a large area of skin around it.

Lindley has now been cancer-free for eight months, and says she is very grateful to have had the dangerous area removed.

Jordan Lindley, 38, from Dallas, was diagnosed with melanoma on her buttocks after getting her skin checked for cancer. She is pictured above after the operation at the Dermatology Treatment and Research Center in the city

Jordan Lindley, 38, from Dallas, was diagnosed with melanoma on her buttocks after getting her skin checked for cancer. She is pictured above after the operation at the Dermatology Treatment and Research Center in the city

Pictured above is the mole that doctors said was stage one melanoma

This is the scar left after it was removed

Pictured above is the mole, left, that doctors said was stage one melanoma. On the right is the scar left shortly after surgery where a 'fist-sized' area of skin around it was removed

She revealed her story alongside the American Academy of Dermatology to remind others to get their skin checked for cancer.

About 200,000 Americans are diagnosed with melanoma every year, estimates   suggest.

It can appear anywhere on the body, with the first symptoms being a mole that is changing in shape, size or color.

This includes looking different from the others possibly due to a new pigment or an unusual-looking spread from the mole to other areas.

If left untreated the disease may spread to other areas of the body triggering metastatic melanoma — which is much more dangerous.

Almost everyone diagnosed with the cancer in the early stages survives, the American Cancer Society says. But for those who only have it detected in later stages this drops to about 30 percent still being alive within five years of diagnosis.

Lindley told DailyMail.com she had always had many small moles as well as freckles. The large one on her buttocks had 'always been there'.

Explaining how it got diagnosed, she said she had always known to get checked because of her healthcare background — but that during the pandemic this had slipped.

Eventually, however, she said it 'got to a point where Covid had died down and I felt I really needed to go, so that was really when I went.'

Lindley said she had noticed no changes in the cancerous mole before the diagnosis which was 'in a place where the sun don't shine'.

But when the results came back as melanoma she and her 14-year-old daughter were both shocked.

It was not clear what triggered the skin cancer, but doctors say people with fair skin, a history of sunburn and who have many moles are at higher risk.

Lindley is pictured above with her 14-year-old daughter. They were both shocked by the diagnosis

Lindley is pictured above with her 14-year-old daughter. They were both shocked by the diagnosis

Dr Ross Radusky, a dermatologist at the Dermatology Treatment and Research Center in Dallas who carried out Lindley's tests, said they paid extra attention to her because she had more than 30 moles and fair features — putting her into the high risk category.

'We did a full skin check,' he said, 'where we look over the skin and inside the eyes, mouth, fingers, toes — and even buttocks'.

Warning signs of melanoma 

A is for Asymmetry. Most melanomas are asymmetrical. If you draw a line through the middle of the lesion, the two halves don't match, so it looks different from a round to oval and symmetrical common mole.

B is for Border. Melanoma borders tend to be uneven and may have scalloped or notched edges, while common moles tend to have smoother, more even borders.

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