Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Breakthrough kidney transplant operation can prevent the need for ... trends now

Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Breakthrough kidney transplant operation can prevent the need for ... trends now
Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Breakthrough kidney transplant operation can prevent the need for ... trends now

Thursday 16 June 2022 11:04 PM Breakthrough kidney transplant operation can prevent the need for ... trends now

Three children with a rare genetic kidney disease have each successfully received a breakthrough transplant operation that did not require the use of immunosuppressant drugs afterwards.

A team at Stanford University, in the Bay area, performed that operations three years ago on children who were suffering from Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD), a condition which inhibits a person's ability to fights infections.

For this procedure, the children not only receive the organ but stem cell and bone marrow transplants from the same donor as well. 

While these children are not yet cured from their condition, they are in a much healthier, safer, place now than they were before the operation, and they will not have to take the risks of using immunosuppressants.

The team that worked on these cases is hopeful that their findings from these three cases can help the 90,000 Americans that are currently awaiting a kidney transplant. 

Kruz, 8, and Paizlee Davenport (pictured), 7, of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, were both born with the rare kidney disease SIOD

Kruz, 8, and Paizlee Davenport (pictured), 7, of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, were both born with the rare kidney disease SIOD

The pair of siblings received dual immune/solid organ transplants from their parents, in a breakthrough operation that doctors hope can be built on to help others with kidney diseases

The pair of siblings received dual immune/solid organ transplants from their parents, in a breakthrough operation that doctors hope can be built on to help others with kidney diseases

Kruz, 8, and Paizlee Davenport, 7, of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, are siblings who both of SIOD - an extreme rarity for a condition where there are only around a dozen active cases worldwide.

Their parents brought them across the country to Stanford in 2019, NBC reports, hoping that the revolutionary treatment proposed by doctors at the world-renowned school could help their children. 

Normal organ transplants can be hard to come by as matches can be rare and hard to

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