Tuesday 2 August 2022 02:36 PM Viewers of Super Surgeons are amazed by doctor's skill after they remove 'huge' ... trends now

Tuesday 2 August 2022 02:36 PM Viewers of Super Surgeons are amazed by doctor's skill after they remove 'huge' ... trends now
Tuesday 2 August 2022 02:36 PM Viewers of Super Surgeons are amazed by doctor's skill after they remove 'huge' ... trends now

Tuesday 2 August 2022 02:36 PM Viewers of Super Surgeons are amazed by doctor's skill after they remove 'huge' ... trends now

Super Surgeons viewers were left amazed last night as doctors removed a 'huge' cancerous tumour weighing 1st from a pensioner's stomach - after other professionals had told him treatment was impossible. 

Ian, 71, appeared on the Channel 4 show last night as he described how a mass had 'gradually spread' across his stomach, and was now the size 'of a rugby ball.'

He explained how he had been referred to palliative care after doctors told him it was 'untreatable' - but it was there a nurse told him to seek a second opinion at the Royal Marsden in London.

After he asked surgeon Mr Dirk Strauss to give him a 'potential future', the doctor went on to remove the full tumour from Ian's stomach.

Many of those watching were amazed by the skill involved in the complex operation, with one saying: 'How does someone train for something like this? Mind-blowing.' 

Super Surgeons viewers were left amazed last night as doctors removed a 'huge' cancerous tumour weighing 1st from Ian, 71,'s stomach - after other professionals had told him treatment was impossible

Super Surgeons viewers were left amazed last night as doctors removed a 'huge' cancerous tumour weighing 1st from Ian, 71,'s stomach - after other professionals had told him treatment was impossible

After he asked surgeon Mr Dirk Strauss to give him a 'potential future', the doctor went on to remove the full tumour from Ian's stomach - which was the size of a rugby ball

After he asked surgeon Mr Dirk Strauss to give him a 'potential future', the doctor went on to remove the full tumour from Ian's stomach - which was the size of a rugby ball 

Meanwhile another wrote: ' Unbelievable - how they managed to remove a mass of that size.'

Appearing on the programme, Ian said: 'My first encounter with cancer was actually way back when I was 23 and I was diagnosed with a testicular tumour.

'It didn't stop me being a man or doing what I want to do - it did stop me having children which was a great loss.

'I've had 35 years and for that I'm grateful. If there's a chance to grab some more of it than I will.'

Many of those watching the programme were left amazed by the 'skill and empathy' from the doctors - whom they call 'unbelievable'

Many of those watching the programme were left amazed by the 'skill and empathy' from the doctors - whom they call 'unbelievable' 

But he went on to describe how he had since developed a second kind of cancer - a fatty sarcoma. 

He said: 'When I first started noticing it, it was about the size of a book and it's gradually spread. It's basically the size of a rugby ball.

'They did a biopsy and they decided it was this particular type of cancer. 

'The team said basically, "We can't do anything" and concluded it was untreatable. So we're basically into palliative care.'

WHAT IS SARCOMA? 

Sarcomas are uncommon types of cancer which can grow anywhere in the body – on muscle, bone, tendons, blood vessels and fatty tissue.

Bone sarcomas are rare and affect approximately 670 people per year – but there are other types of bone cancers.

There are around 100 different types of sarcomas and about 5,300 people are year are diagnosed with them in the UK.

Sarcomas can be treated well if people catch them early, but many people do not get diagnosed until their tumours are about the size of a tin of beans.

Only slightly more than half of people with sarcomas (55 per cent) survive for five years or more after their diagnosis.

Symptoms of sarcomas can include bone pain, swellings or lumps, and restricted movement if it is growing near a joint.

Treatment may involve typical cancer therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. 

Source: Sarcoma UK 

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