Wednesday 10 August 2022 09:13 PM The best ways to ward off dementia revealed, according to science trends now

Wednesday 10 August 2022 09:13 PM The best ways to ward off dementia revealed, according to science trends now
Wednesday 10 August 2022 09:13 PM The best ways to ward off dementia revealed, according to science trends now

Wednesday 10 August 2022 09:13 PM The best ways to ward off dementia revealed, according to science trends now

It's finally been settled. The best way to protect yourself against dementia is to keep your brain stimulated, a major review suggests. 

People who regularly read books, played musical instruments or keep a personal diary have a 23 per cent lower risk of developing the condition.

The analysis of dozens of studies involving 2million middle-aged and older people also found physical activity was the next best thing for keeping the brain sharp.

Regularly playing sports, doing yoga or dancing was found to have a 17 per cent protective effect.

And people with a vibrant social lives appear to have a 7 per cent lower risk of developing dementia than loners.

Researchers said joining a club, volunteering, spending time with friends and families or going to religious events all had a positive effect.

Lead author Professor Lin Lu, from Pecking University in Beijing, said: 'This meta-analysis suggests that being active has benefits, and there are plenty of activities that are easy to incorporate into daily life that may be beneficial to the brain.'

Researchers at Pecking University in Beijing examined patterns in hobbies and cases of dementia among 2.1million people. The findings show that those who engage in mental tasks — such as reading, writing and even watching TV — were a quarter less likely to receive a dementia diagnosis. Meanwhile, staying active reduced the risk by a fifth and meeting up with others lowered the likelihood by a tenth

Researchers at Pecking University in Beijing examined patterns in hobbies and cases of dementia among 2.1million people. The findings show that those who engage in mental tasks — such as reading, writing and even watching TV — were a quarter less likely to receive a dementia diagnosis. Meanwhile, staying active reduced the risk by a fifth and meeting up with others lowered the likelihood by a tenth 

People who regularly read books, played musical instruments or keep a personal diary have a 23 per cent lower risk of developing the condition

People who regularly read books, played musical instruments or keep a personal diary have a 23 per cent lower risk of developing the condition

Their results were published in the journal Neurology.

WHAT IS DEMENTIA? THE KILLER DISEASE THAT ROBS SUFFERERS OF THEIR MEMORIES 

A GLOBAL CONCERN 

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders (those affecting the brain) which impact memory, thinking and behaviour. 

There are many different types of dementia, of which Alzheimer’s disease is the most common.

Some people may have a combination of types of dementia.

Regardless of which type is diagnosed, each person will experience their dementia in their own unique way.

Dementia is a global concern but it is most often seen in wealthier countries, where people are likely to live into very old age.

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE AFFECTED?

The Alzheimer's Society reports there are more than 900,000 people living with dementia in the UK today. This is projected to rise to 1.6million by 2040.

Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting between 50 and 75 per cent of those diagnosed.

In the US, it's estimated there are 6million Alzheimer's sufferers. A similar percentage rise is expected in the coming years.

As a person’s age increases, so does the risk of them developing dementia.

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