Tuesday 27 September 2022 12:08 AM Three coffees a day cuts risk of an early death, study finds (and it does NOT ... trends now

Tuesday 27 September 2022 12:08 AM Three coffees a day cuts risk of an early death, study finds (and it does NOT ... trends now
Tuesday 27 September 2022 12:08 AM Three coffees a day cuts risk of an early death, study finds (and it does NOT ... trends now

Tuesday 27 September 2022 12:08 AM Three coffees a day cuts risk of an early death, study finds (and it does NOT ... trends now

Forget what you've been told — drinking two cups of coffee every day may not be bad for your health.

In fact, scientists now recommend it. 

For research has shown coffee lovers tend to live longer and have healthier hearts than peers who don't indulge in a daily cup of joe.

And experts said the benefits were true for all types of coffee, meaning it's not just decaf drinkers who benefit from its supposed effects.

The Australian researchers behind the study say their findings suggest a moderate coffee habit can be considered 'part of a healthy diet'. 

Two to three coffees — the amount recommended — is in line with what the average Briton and American drinks.    

Drinking two to three mugs daily — in line with the amount consumed by the average Briton and American — is linked to living longer and a lower risk of heart problems, according to researchers in Australia

Drinking two to three mugs daily — in line with the amount consumed by the average Briton and American — is linked to living longer and a lower risk of heart problems, according to researchers in Australia 

HOW MUCH COFFEE SHOULD I DRINK? 

The NHS says it is fine to drink coffee as part of a balanced diet.   

Besides caffeine, the drink contains many minerals and antioxidants.

Some studies have found it can reduce the risk of cancer, obesity, type 2 diabetes and dementia.

However, other studies have found it can increase the risk of suffering from high blood pressure.

The NHS warns drinking more than four cups a day can increase blood pressure.

It advises switching to other non-caffeinated drinks. 

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The researchers, based at Melbourne's Baker Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, said there is little information on how each type of coffee impacts heart health and survival rates.

To get to the bottom of this, they examined data on 449,563 people included in the UK Biobank.

The massive database contains the health records on half a million Britons, who are regularly quizzed on their lifestyle habits.

Participants, who were aged 40 to 69, completed questionnaires on how many cups they drank per day and whether they opted for instant, ground or decaffeinated.

The findings, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, show 44 per cent drank instant, 18 per cent ground and 15 per cent decaf. 

Just over a fifth did not drink coffee.

Over the course of the 13-year study, nearly 28,000 participants died.

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