Negative effects of lockdowns on children now include worse balance as a new ... trends now

Negative effects of lockdowns on children now include worse balance as a new ... trends now
Negative effects of lockdowns on children now include worse balance as a new ... trends now

Negative effects of lockdowns on children now include worse balance as a new ... trends now

Restrictions on children's activities during pandemic lockdowns damaged their ability to stand up straight. 

School closures threw young people's lives into chaos and were linked to a rise in social problems, mental health issues, and stunted development

Now, a study has found that closures also affected children's ability to balance because they spent more time engrossed in technology and not enough time playing outside with peers. 

Study leader Dr Tadashi Ito, a motion analysis expert from the Nagoya University, said: 'Limitations on children's opportunities for physical activity because of the outbreak of the novel coronavirus have had a significant impact on the development of physical function and lifestyle and may cause physical deterioration and health problems in the future.' 

Children's abilities to balance were harmed during the pandemic when after-school sports were restricted, children couldn't play with friends outside as much, and, as a result, spent more time on screens

Children's abilities to balance were harmed during the pandemic when after-school sports were restricted, children couldn't play with friends outside as much, and, as a result, spent more time on screens 

The abrupt change to the way children get physically active hindered their ability to hone the body's muscles which help with balance while moving. Walking, for instance, requires you to stand on one leg at one time. Weak leg muscles make doing that very difficult. 

It also meant that children got less sleep, had a higher bodyfat percentage BLA BLA

The study was conducted by doctors from Nagoya University and the Aichi Prefectural Mikawa Aoitori Medical and Rehabilitation Center for Developmental Disabilities.

The researchers, led by Dr Ito, found that during the pandemic, children in that age group were more likely to have decreased balance ability when moving. 

Dr Ito said: 'Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus in Japan after April 2020, children have not been able to engage in sufficient physical education, sports activities, and outdoor play at school.

'It became clear that balance ability during movement was easily affected, lifestyle habits were disrupted, and the percentage of body fat was likely to increase.' 

The team obtained medical exam results from 60 Japanese

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